Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric:
Hi, everyone, and welcome back to NorwegianClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 25 - Opening a Norwegian Bank Account. Eric here.
Mai:
Hei, I'm Mai.
Eric:
In this lesson, you’ll learn about opening a bank account and review useful sentence structures. The conversation takes place at a bank.
Mai:
It's between Martin and a receptionist.
Eric:
The speakers are strangers; therefore, they’ll speak both formal and informal Norwegian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Martin:
Hei, jeg skulle gjerne blitt kunde hos dere.
Resepsjonist:
Så hyggelig. Hvis du er over atten år, anbefaler jeg deg en vanlig personkonto. Det passer ofte best for unge.
Martin:
Ja, jeg er over 18 år. Hva innebærer en vanlig personkonto?
Resepsjonist:
Det innebærer at du få en personkonto, bankkort, tilgang til både mobil- og nettbank. Du kan også opprette en sparekonto, i tillegg til brukskontoen. Bankortet koster 250 kr i året. Jeg ville også anbefale deg å søke om et mastercard som har mange fordeler i tilfelle noe skulle skje.
Martin:
Jaha, hva er forskjellen på en brukskonto og en sparekonto?
Resepsjonist:
Vel, brukskontoen din har samme nummer som personnummeret ditt og du kan fritt ta ut penger fra minibanker ettersom bankkortet ditt er bundet til brukskontoen. Hvis du mister eller noen stjeler kortet ditt, så får de ikke tilgang til sparekontoen din, siden den ikke er bundet til noe kort. Du kan med sikkerhet spare store beløp i sparekontoen.
Martin:
Dette hørtes veldig lokkende ut. Når er kundeservice tilgjengelig?
Resepsjonist:
Kundeservicen vår er tilgjengelig 24 timer i døgnet, hver dag.
Martin:
Jeg skjønner. Da vil jeg gjerne etablere et kundeforhold hos dere.
Resepsjonist:
Tusen takk. Har du gyldig legitimasjon eller pass med deg?
Martin:
Ja, vær så god.
Eric:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Martin:
Hi, I would like to become a customer of yours.
Receptionist:
How nice. If you are over eighteen, I recommend an ordinary personal account. That often suits young people best.
Martin:
Yes, I'm over eighteen years old. What does a normal personal account entail?
Receptionist:
That entails that you get a personal account, credit card, and access to mobile and internet accounts. You can also set up a savings account, in addition to the checking account. The credit card costs 250 kr a year. I would also recommend you apply for a MasterCard, which has a lot of advantages in case something should happen.
Martin:
Okay, what's the difference between a checking account and a savings account?
Receptionist:
Well, your checking account has the same number as your social security number, and you can freely withdraw money from ATM's, since your credit card is bound to the checking account. If you lose or somebody steals your card, they won't get access to your savings account, since it's not bound to any card. You can with certainty save big amounts in the savings account.
Martin:
This sounds very alluring. When is customer service available?
Receptionist:
Our customer service is available 24 hours a day, every day.
Martin:
I see. Then I would like to establish a customer relationship with you.
Receptionist:
Thank you. Do you have a valid identity card or passport with you?
Martin:
Yes, here you go.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric:
Sounds like a relatively stress-free meeting at the bank for Martin.
Mai:
Yes, he sounds like he’s managed to get everything sorted pretty easily.
Eric:
What can you tell us about the banking system in Norway?
Mai:
Fully virtual banking has been around for several years now in Norway.
Eric:
Yes, I noticed that the bank worker talked about mobile and internet accounts.
Mai:
Yes, people usually pay bills, transfer money, and check their accounts using only a finger on a phone screen.
Eric:
There’s not much need to physically go to the bank anymore.
Mai:
Not at all.
Eric:
I guess that people don’t use cash as much in Norway anymore.
Mai:
No, they don’t. Most people only carry a few coins these days.
Eric:
Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Mai:
å innebære [natural native speed]
Eric:
to entail
Mai:
å innebære [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
å innebære [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
tilgang [natural native speed]
Eric:
access
Mai:
tilgang [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
tilgang [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
fordel [natural native speed]
Eric:
benefit
Mai:
fordel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
fordel [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
konto [natural native speed]
Eric:
account
Mai:
konto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
konto [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
bankkort [natural native speed]
Eric:
credit card
Mai:
bankkort [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
bankkort [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
i tilfelle [natural native speed]
Eric:
just in case
Mai:
i tilfelle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
i tilfelle [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
bundet [natural native speed]
Eric:
bound, tied
Mai:
bundet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
bundet [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
lokkende [natural native speed]
Eric:
alluring
Mai:
lokkende [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
lokkende [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have...
Mai:
tilgjengelig [natural native speed]
Eric:
available
Mai:
tilgjengelig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
tilgjengelig [natural native speed]
Eric:
And last...
Mai:
å etablere [natural native speed]
Eric:
to establish
Mai:
å etablere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai:
å etablere [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric:
Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Mai:
personnummer
Eric:
meaning "personal number." What is this?
Mai:
This is an ID number that every Norwegian has.
Eric:
What’s it used for?
Mai:
It’s used in official settings, such as opening a bank account or as a username when you log in to your internet banking.
Eric:
Can you give us an example using this word?
Mai:
Sure. For example, you can say, Mitt personnummer er 30069448026.
Eric:
...which means "My personal number is 30069448026."
Eric:
Okay, what's the next word?
Mai:
bundet
Eric:
meaning "tied." So this is a verb.
Mai:
Yes, it’s the past tense of the verb å binde.
Eric:
This means “to tie” or “to bind.”
Mai:
It’s used very similarly to the English.
Eric:
Can you give us an example using this word?
Mai:
Sure. For example, you can say, Denne kontrakten er bindende.
Eric:
...which means "This contract is binding."
Eric:
Okay, what's the next word?
Mai:
å etablere
Eric:
meaning "to establish." How can this word be used?
Mai:
You can use it to talk about establishing a company, or establishing yourself in a country.
Eric:
Oh, so when you’ve settled in a country?
Mai:
That’s right.
Eric:
Can you give us an example using this word?
Mai:
Sure. For example, you can say, Selskapet var etablert i 1919.
Eric:
...which means "The company was established in 1919. "
Eric:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric:
In this lesson, you'll learn about about opening a bank account, and review useful sentence structures. Okay, so what do we need to know about Norwegian sentence structure?
Mai:
Norwegian sentences need a subject and a verb. They often have an object too.
Eric:
Do these go in any particular order?
Mai:
The verb must be the second element in a Norwegian main clause.
Eric:
So many basic sentences would follow a subject, verb, object pattern. Or, SVO for short.
Mai:
Yes. Many of these sentences use å være as the verb.
Eric:
Remember, listeners, that means “to be.” You can make many simple sentences using this verb.
Mai:
Right. Such as Jeg er norsk.
Eric:
“I am Norwegian.”
Mai:
Also Jeg er student.
Eric:
“I am a student.”
Mai:
If the sentence doesn’t start with the subject, then it’ll follow the verb. For example, Nå snakker han norsk.
Eric:
Which means “Now he speaks Norwegian.” What if there’s more than one verb?
Mai:
Then the subject goes in the middle. For example, Nå kan han snakke norsk.
Eric:
“Now he can speak Norwegian.” How would you make that negative? Where does the negation go?
Mai:
After the verb. Han snakker ikke norsk.
Eric:
“He doesn’t speak Norwegian.”
Mai:
If the subject comes after the verb, ikke is positioned after the subject. For example, Nå snakker han ikke norsk.
Eric:
“Now he does not speak Norwegian.” Okay. Thanks for that quick review! Now, let’s look at some words and phrases that’ll help us deal with banks and bank accounts.
Mai:
Two important words are kredittkort and bankkort.
Eric:
“Credit card” and “bank card,” respectively.
Mai:
Two more important words are uttak and the verb å ta ut.
Eric:
That’s “withdrawal,” and the verb “to withdraw.”
Mai:
And the opposite is å sette in.
Eric:
“To deposit.” How do we say “to open an account?”
Mai:
åpne en konto. After opening an account, you’ll get a kontonummer.
Eric:
“Bank account number.” How about the word “transaction?”
Mai:
transaksjon. And “direct payment” is direktebetaling.
Eric:
Okay, thanks for those! There are more words listed in the lesson notes, so be sure to check them out!

Outro

Eric:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson and this series. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you in another series! Bye!
Mai:
Ha det bra!

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Hello listeners! What would you say if you were to open a bank account in Norway?