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How To Post In Perfect Norwegian on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Norwegian, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Norwegian.

At Learn Norwegian, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Norwegian in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Norwegian

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Norwegian. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Olav eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Olav’s post.

God mat med godt selskap!
“Good food in good company!”

1- God mat

First is an expression meaning “Good food.”
This is a very basic phrase in Norwegian. You can use it to express, in a brief and effective way, that the food is tasty.

2- med godt selskap

Then comes the phrase – “with good company.”
This phrase is similar to the previous which uses the adjective meaning “good” and a noun. Notice that the adjective changes to the neuter form to agree with the noun gender. In general, you can use this expression to indicate that you are with good friends.

COMMENTS

In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

1- Hvorfor ble ikke jeg invitert?

His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “Why wasn’t I invited? ”
Use this expression if you’re really upset about not being invited, or if you’re in a humorous mood and asks this question rhetorically.

2- Jeg håper gutta koser seg!

His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “I hope the guys are enjoying themselves!”
This is a friendly wish to the party, and a pleasant way to make small talk online.

3- Så koselig!

His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “How nice!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted about the poster’s experience.

4- Jeg ønsker dere en fin kveld. Hilsen Per

His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “I wish you a nice evening. Best, Per”
This is a slightly more stilted way of doing the same as Morten – expressing a friendly wish. In this instance, Per is clearly not used to social media, therefore he adds his name to the post.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • god: “good”
  • å invitere: “to invite”
  • å håpe: “to hope”
  • koselig: “nice, cozy”
  • kveld: “evening”
  • selskap: “company”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Norwegian restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Norwegian

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Norwegian phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Anne shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Søstershopping er det beste.
    “Shopping with your sister is the best.”

    1- Søstershopping

    First is an expression meaning “Sister-shopping .”
    This word would typically be used in a colloquial setting, such as social media, as it is a combination of the word “sister” and “shopping.” Many words that are usually written with a hyphen or as two words in English are written as one in Norwegian, like this word.

    2- er det beste

    Then comes the phrase – “is the best .”
    This phrase is very useful when you want to express what you like the most.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Kjøp forskjellige ting så vi kan se forskjell på dere!

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Buy different things so (that) we can see the difference between the two of you!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- Kjøp noe til meg?

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “Buy something for me?”
    Use this expression to start a conversation (questions are good that way), or if you feel slightly neglected!

    3- Ikke bruk for mye penger!

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t spend too much money!”
    This can be an expression of real concern, if the poster is a big spender. Or it could just be a comment to make conversation.

    4- God shopping!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Good shopping!”
    This is a warmhearted wish for a pleasant experience.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • best: “best”
  • å kjøpe: “to buy”
  • noe: “something”
  • penger: “money”
  • å shoppe: “to shop”
  • forskjell: “difference”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Norwegian

    Sporting events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Norwegian.

    Olav plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team playing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Volleyball på stranda er digg!
    “Volleyball on the beach is awesome!”

    1- Volleyball på stranda

    First is an expression meaning “Volleyball on the beach.”
    This phrase is stating in a simple manner both what is going on and where. Norwegians love to spend time at the beach during summer, as most of the time the weather is horrible. Volleyball, like many words, is borrowed directly from English and is spelled the same.

    2- er digg

    Then comes the phrase – “is awesome.”
    This phrase is a commonly used term, mostly amongst young people, which means the same as “awesome,” “sweet,” or “cool.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Er det fint nok vær til det da?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “Is the weather nice enough for that?”
    Use this expression if you feel pessimistic about the weather.

    2- Er det noen fine damer som er med?

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Are any pretty ladies joining in?”
    This is a remark that shows humour and perhaps a bit of teasing.

    3- Husk solkrem!

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “Remember the sunscreen!”
    This is a suitable remark to make if you are worried about the poster’s wellbeing in the sun, but take care not to come across as a parent!

    4- Ikke få sand i munnen.

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t get sand in your mouth.”
    This is a good expression to use if you’re feeling humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strand: “beach”
  • vær: “weather”
  • dame: “lady”
  • solkrem: “sunscreen”
  • sand: “sand”
  • å huske: “to remember”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Norwegian

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Anne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Dette er det jeg kaller bra musikk!
    “This is what I call good music!”

    1- Dette er det jeg kaller

    First is an expression meaning “This is what I call .”
    In Norwegian, instead of simply stating that something is or isn’t good, we often use the phrase “This is what I call”, followed by a phrase.

    2- bra musikk

    Then comes the phrase – “good music .”
    This phrase is useful when you want to introduce your music preferences to your friends. You can substitute the word “music” with something else.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ja, den er fengende.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Yes, it’s catchy.”
    Use this expression to show that you agree with the poster’s comment.

    2- Jeg hører mer på de gamle klassikerne.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “I listen more to the (old) classics.”
    Use this expression to share an opposing personal opinion.

    3- Det var den vi hørte på festen her forleden.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “This was the one we heard at the party the other day.”
    Share a bit of personal information to warm up the conversation!

    4- Denne liker jeg også!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “I also like this! ”
    This is a commonly-used expression when you agree with someone’s taste in anything.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • musikk: “music”
  • fengende: “catchy”
  • gammel: “old”
  • fest: “party”
  • også: “also”
  • klassiker: “classic”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Norwegian Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers with in Norwegian!

    Olav goes to a concert, posts an image of the band on stage, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Øyafestivalen var fantastisk!
    “Øya festival was fantastic!”

    1- Øyafestivalen

    First is an expression meaning “Øya festival.”
    Øya festival, or in English “The Island festival,” is one of the biggest summer festivals in Norway. It is held annually in Oslo, usually in mid August.

    2- var fantastisk

    Then comes the phrase – “was fantastic.”
    Like many expressions used in the Norwegian language this one is a loanword, a word taken from a different language, in this case the English “fantastic.” This phrase is in the past tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du må ta meg med neste gang.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “You must take me with you next time. ”
    Use this expression to show your hope to be included in the party next time.

    2- All musikk nå er dårlig.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “All music now is bad. ”
    Use this expression with care! This is a rather negative opinion.

    3- Det er masse bra konserter nå om sommeren!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “There are a lot of good concerts (now) during summer!”
    In contrast with the previous comment, this one is a positive opinion.

    4- Jeg fikk dessverre ikke dratt dit i år…

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Unfortunately, I didn’t get to go there this year…”
    This comment is good to be part of a conversation, sharing a bit of personal information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • festival: “festival”
  • gang: “time”
  • konsert: “concert”
  • dårlig: “bad”
  • år: “year”
  • dessverre: “unfortunately”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Norwegian

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Norwegian phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Anne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Enda en knust telefon…
    “Another shattered phone…”

    1- Enda en

    First is an expression meaning “Another.”
    In Norwegian this expression can be used to mean both “another,” as in different, as well as “another one,” as in “I’ll have another one, please.”

    2- knust telefon

    Then comes the phrase – “broken phone.”
    With smartphones being as popular as they are in Norway, saying a phone is broken rarely means that the whole phone has stopped working. These days it is likely to mean that the screen is cracked or shattered.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du får bruke hustelefonen fremover.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “You can use a landline telephone from now on.”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    2- Jeg vet om et sted som fikser sånt for en billig penge!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “I know a place where they can fix things like that for a cheap price!”
    Use this expression if you want to be helpful.

    3- Jeg bruker ikke smarttelefon og mobiltelefonen min har vart meg lenge.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “I’m not using a smartphone and my mobile phone has lasted me a long time. ”
    Use this expression if you feel you have good advice to give.

    4- Om du har forsikring så er det ikke så dyrt å få den reparert.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “If you have insurance, it’s not too expensive to get it fixed.”
    This expression shows positive support and encouragement.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å knuse: “to break”
  • å bruke: “to use”
  • billig: “cheap”
  • mobiltelefon: “mobile phone”
  • forsikring: “insurance”
  • hustelefon: “landline”
  • dyr: “expensive”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to talk about an accident in Norwegian. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Norwegian

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Norwegian!

    Olav gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg kjeder meg sånn. Hva kan jeg finne på?
    “I’m so bored. What can I do? ”

    1- Jeg kjeder meg sånn.

    First is an expression meaning “I’m so bored. .”
    Being bored is not expressed as a state of being in Norwegian. Rather, it is expressed as a verb. “I am boring myself” would be the most direct translation. Its meaning, however, is exactly that of the English “I am bored.”

    2- Hva kan jeg finne på?

    Then comes the phrase – “What can I do?.”
    A literal translation of this question, often asked to oneself, is “what can I find to do?” Norwegians will often express both boredom and wanting to find something to do out loud – sometimes, even if alone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du kan gå en tur i finværet?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “You can go for a walk in this nice weather?”
    Use this expression if you want to give advice.

    2- Bli med å ta en øl!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Come and grab a beer!”
    Use this expression if you want to make a suggestion to alleviate the poster’s problem.

    3- Plukk opp en god bok.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Pick up a good book. ”
    This is another suggestion to remedy the problem of boredom.

    4- Vask huset så blir din samboer glad.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “Clean the house and your partner will be happy.”
    This is a slightly sarcastic, mostly humorous suggestion to use.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å kjede seg: “to be bored”
  • tur: “walk”
  • øl: “beer”
  • å plukke: “to pick”
  • å vaske: “to wash/ to clean”
  • samboer: “cohabitant”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Norwegian

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Norwegian about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Anne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    I dag er jeg helt utslitt.
    “I’m completely exhausted today.”

    1- I dag er jeg

    First is an expression meaning “Today I am.”
    This part of the sentence is there to show that this is a state lasting or caused by the whole previous day, and is not just present at the moment. You can change the indication of time to refer to a different period, such as “this week”, “this morning,” and so on.

    2- helt utslitt

    Then comes the phrase – “completely exhausted.”
    The direct translation of this expression is “completely worn out,” but it also means the same as “exhausted.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lag deg en kopp te og slapp av!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Make yourself a cup of tea and relax!”
    Use this expression to make a positive suggestion.

    2- Se på komedie! Det vil nok muntre deg opp.

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Watch a comedy! That’ll cheer you up.”
    This is another suggestion that should be helpful to help with fatigue.

    3- Du har jo en lett jobb!

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “You have an easy job!”
    This is a somewhat sarcastic but mostly humorous comment.

    4- Nå må du ikke stresse for mye.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t get too stressed out. ”
    This phrase and suggestion shows caring and concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • utslitt: “exhausted”
  • te: “tea”
  • komedie: “comedy”
  • lett: “easy”
  • mye: “much, a lot”
  • kopp: “cup”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you also know how to say you’re exhausted in Norwegian! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Norwegian

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Norwegian.

    Olav suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg ødela kneet på treningssenteret.
    “I busted my knee at the gym. ”

    1- Jeg ødela kneet

    First is an expression meaning “I busted my knee”.
    Although the literal translation of this expression is “I broke the knee,” it is implied that you are referring to “my knee.” This phrase does not necessarily imply a permanent or serious injury.

    2- på treningssenteret

    Then comes the phrase – “at the gym.”
    This shows the location and implies this happened during physical training at the gym. You can keep the same preposition and name a different place to refer to somewhere else.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Å nei, skal vi til legen?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “Oh no, should we go to the emergency room? ”
    Use this suggestion to show you are feeling concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    2- God bedring!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Get well soon!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well. It is very commonly used and well known.

    3- Jeg håper du har en god sofa.

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “I hope you have a good couch. ”
    Use this expression to show a bit of humour in a bleak situation.

    4- Det blir nok fort bedre, så sporty som du er!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “As sporty as you are, it’ll heal soon.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling optimistic about the poster’s prospects of healing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å ødelegge: “to destroy”
  • lege: “doctor”
  • God bedring!: “Get well soon!”
  • sofa: “couch”
  • fort: “fast”
  • kne: “knee”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Norwegian

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Anne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Å nei, jeg håpet på fint vær idag!
    “Oh no, I was hoping for nice weather today!”

    1- Å nei, jeg håpet

    First is an expression meaning “Oh no, I had hoped.”
    This is a simple expression stating that the speaker is disappointed and had previously hoped for something. It is often used when something does not turn out the way one wanted it to. It is usually used when there is a reason to hope for or expect something and is used mostly on social media, but is rarely written in more formal text.

    2- på fint vær idag

    Then comes the phrase – “for nice weather today..”
    In this case, the speaker had hoped that today’s weather would be nice, but you can substitute “nice weather” with a different expression.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing. (Norwegian idiom) ”
    This is a somewhat humorous expression to use related to the weather.

    2- Du får kose deg inne i stedet da.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “You’ll have to have a cozy time inside instead then.”
    This is a suggestion showing perhaps that the poster could make the best of a bad situation.

    3- Dårlig vær bygger karakter.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Bad weather builds character.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling slightly humorous.

    4- Håper det blir fint etter hvert.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “Hope it will clear up eventually.”
    Use this phrase if you want to wish for something good regarding the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vær: “weather”
  • dårlig: “bad”
  • inne: “inside”
  • deg: “you “
  • fint: “fine”
  • etter hvert: “eventually”
  • How would you comment in Norwegian when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Norwegian

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Olav changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    I et forhold med Anne.
    “In a relationship with Anne.”

    1- I et forhold

    First is an expression meaning “In a relationship.”
    This statement expresses the speaker’s state of being in a romantic relationship. It can also stand alone as a sentence by itself, where it will mean “in a relationship.”

    2- med Anne

    Then comes the phrase – “with Anne.”
    This simply shows that Anne is the person with whom the speaker is in a romantic relationship.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg elsker deg.

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “I love you.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling loving.

    2- Gratulerer!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations!”
    This is a common response to a positive announcement.

    3- Olav har endelig fått seg dame!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Olav finally got a girlfriend!”
    This is a humorous comment that teases the poster a bit.

    4- Det var en hyggelig nyhet.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “This is pleasant news. ”
    Use this expression if you are feeling positive about the news.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • forhold: “relationship”
  • å elske: “to love”
  • å gratulere: “to congratulate”
  • endelig: “finally”
  • hyggelig: “pleasant”
  • nyhet: “news”
  • What would you say in Norwegian when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news – don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Norwegian

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Norwegian.

    Anne is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    I dag skal jeg gifte meg!
    “Today I’m getting married!”

    1- I dag skal jeg

    First is an expression meaning “Today I am going to.”
    This states something the speaker is intending to do today. It can be used for both something that will be a day-long activity or something shorter taking place sometime today.

    2- gifte meg

    Then comes the phrase – “get married.”
    In Norwegian, this is expressed literally as “to marry oneself.” It is a reflexive verb. The meaning, however, is the same as the English “to get married.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg gleder meg til seremonien.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “I’m looking forward to the ceremony.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted about attending the wedding.

    2- Nå blir det fest!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Now, let’s party!”
    Make this humorous suggestion if you feel exuberant and positive about the news.

    3- Du kommer til å se så fin ut i den kjolen Anne!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “You’re going to look so nice in that dress, Anne!”
    Say this if you mean to compliment the bride on her choice of wedding dress.

    4- Du slår deg ned allerede?

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “You’re settling down already?”
    Use this expression if you feel humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å gifte seg : “to marry”
  • seremoni: “ceremony”
  • å bli: “to become”
  • kjole: “dress”
  • å slå seg ned: “to settle down”
  • å glede seg: “to look forward to “
  • How would you respond in Norwegian to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Norwegian

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Norwegian.

    Olav finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of a pregnant Anne, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg skal bli pappa!
    “I’m going to be a dad!”

    1- Jeg skal bli

    First is an expression meaning “I’m going to be.”
    This expresses that the speaker is going to experience a change of state and is a common phrase in Norwegian. You can also use it when you talk about your future career, where you will state the occupation after this phrase.

    2- pappa

    Then comes the phrase – “a dad.”
    In this case, the new state of being is as a father. “Pappa” is a colloquial word, much like the English “dad.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du må fortsatt bli med meg ut på byen, min venn!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “My friend, you still need to go out on the town with me!”
    Use this expression if you are in a frivolous mood and want to be humorous.

    2- Dette var hjertevarmende nyheter!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “This was heartwarming news!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and pleased about the news.

    3- Det gikk fort!

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “That went fast!”
    Use this expression to be slightly sarcastic and humorous.

    4- Jeg håper barnet vil ligne på Anne!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “I hope the child will look like Anne!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pappa: “dad”
  • by: “city”
  • hjertevarmende: “heartwarming”
  • fort: “fast/quick”
  • å ligne: “to resemble”
  • barn: “child”
  • å måtte: “to have to “
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Norwegian Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Norwegian.

    Anne plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Se på dette nydelige smilet!
    “Look at this lovely smile!”

    1- Se på dette

    First is an expression meaning “Look at this .”
    This is an expression often used to draw attention to something positive or nice.

    2- nydelige smilet

    Then comes the phrase – “lovely smile.”
    This is a standard way of complimenting a smile.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ta kontakt om dere trenger en barnevakt!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Let me know if you need a babysitter!”
    Use this expression to show your support and willingness to help.

    2- Hun blir nok snill og smart, som foreldrene sine.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “She will probably be kind and smart, like her parents.”
    Use this expression to compliment the parents.

    3- Så flott hun er!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “She is so beautiful!”
    Use this expression to compliment someone’s looks.

    4- Jeg er veldig stolt!

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “I am so proud!”
    Use this expression if you feel proud about something.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • smil: “smile”
  • nydelig: “lovely, gorgeous”
  • smart: “smart”
  • barnevakt: “babysitter”
  • stolt: “proud”
  • veldig: “very “
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Norwegian! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Norwegian Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions – some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Olav goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Da er familien samlet igjen hos mor og far.
    “The family is gathered again at mom and dad’s place.”

    1- Da er familien samlet igjen

    First is an expression meaning “The family is gathered again.”
    This is a common expression for when a family is rarely together at once in one place.

    2- hos mor og far

    Then comes the phrase – “at mom and dad’s place.”
    Directly translated this means “at mom and dad,” but the English translation becomes “at mom and dad’s place,” as the location is implied rather than specified.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Det var et utrolig koselig besøk!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “That was a very nice visit!”
    Use this expression if you also want to comment on the event.

    2- Olav, familiemedlemmene dine ser så like ut jeg klarer ikke se forskjell!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Olav, your family members look so similar I can’t tell the difference!”
    Use this expression if you want to be humorous.

    3- Du må hilse så mye til dine foreldre.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Give your parents my regards.”
    This is a standard, polite phrase to use if you wish to greet the poster’s parents via the poster.

    4- Dette må være den beste måten å nyte sommeren.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “This must be the best way to enjoy summer.”
    Use this expression if you want to comment positively on the event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • familie: “family”
  • familiemedlem: “family member”
  • besøk: “parent”
  • besøk: “visit”
  • forskjell: “difference”
  • å nyte: “to enjoy”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Norwegian

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Norwegian about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Anne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of the boarding gate, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Nå er vi ved utgangen og venter på flyet.
    “We are now at the gate, waiting for our flight.”

    1- Nå er vi ved utgangen

    First is an expression meaning “We are now at the gate.”
    In Norwegian, the word indicating the gate that leads to a plane in an airport actually means “exit.”

    2- og venter på flyet

    Then comes the phrase – “waiting for the flight.”
    Since the sentence starts with “now,” it is important to keep all the verbs in the sentence in the present tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- God tur!

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Have a good trip!”
    Use this expression to greet someone in an old-fashioned way.

    2- Hvor skal dere?

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Where are you going?”
    Use this expression if you’re curious about someone’s travel destination.

    3- Norge er vel bra nok, hvorfor dra noe annet sted?

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “Surely Norway is good enough, so why go somewhere else?”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous, teasing mood.

    4- Jeg tror dere kommer til å ha en super tur.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “I think you’re going to have a great trip.”
    Use this phrase to express your optimistic hopes for someone’s trip.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • utgang: “exit, gate”
  • god: “good”
  • hvor: “where”
  • hvorfor: “why”
  • annen: “other”
  • å tro: “to believe”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Norwegian!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Norwegian

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Norwegian phrases!

    Olav finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Nå skal vi prøve ut mye nytt!
    “Now, we’re going to try out a lot of new things!”

    1- Nå skal vi prøve ut

    First is an expression meaning: “Now we’re going to try out.”
    A useful expression for stating that one intends to do something new, something one hasn’t experienced before.

    2- mye nytt

    Then comes the phrase – “a lot of new things.”
    This phrase directly translated simply means “a lot of new,” but the English meaning is “a lot of new things.” It can be used for both objects and happenings.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mye var bra, og noe var litt merkelig…

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “A lot was good, but some of it was a bit weird…”
    Use this phrase to express your ambivalent feelings about something.

    2- Det er alltid bra med litt forandring i hverdagen.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “It’s always good to have some variety in life.”
    Use this expression to share a stoic philosophy about life.

    3- Dere fortjener å kose dere masse!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “You deserve to enjoy yourselves (so much)!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted and generous towards the travellers.

    4- Man lærer alltid nye ting av å reise en ny plass.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “One always learns so much from traveling to a new place.”
    Use this expression to share your idea of the virtues of traveling.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å prøve: “to try”
  • mye: “much”
  • forandring: “change”
  • å fortjene: “to deserve”
  • alltid: “always”
  • ny: “new”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Norwegian

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Norwegian, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Anne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Dette er noe av det flotteste jeg noensinne har sett!
    “This is one of the most beautiful things I’ve seen!”

    1- Dette er noe av det flotteste

    First is an expression meaning “This is one of the most beautiful things.”
    In this phrase, “the” and the adjective in the phrase have to be conjugated according to the noun in question.

    2- jeg noensinne har sett

    Then comes the phrase – “I have ever seen.”
    This phrase can be used when describing the worst/best/weirdest/etc. thing you have ever seen.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg er helt enig.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “I agree completely.”
    Use this expression if you agree full-heartedly with the poster.

    2- Fikk dere tatt mange bilder så jeg kan se senere?

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Did you take many pictures so that I can see later?”
    Use this expression if you are eager to see any photos the poster might have taken.

    3- Kult!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Cool!”
    Use this expression just so give a positive comment, showing your enthusiasm for whatever the poster shared.

    4- Jeg håper jeg også får tatt turen dit en dag.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “I hope I get the chance to travel there someday too.”
    Use this expression to share your personal hopes for traveling to a specific location.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • noe: “something”
  • å være enig: “to agree”
  • bilde: “picture”
  • kul: “cool”
  • dere: “you “
  • tur: “trip”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Norwegian

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Norwegian!

    Olav relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Her kan jeg bli for alltid!
    “I could stay here forever!”

    1- Her kan jeg bli

    First is an expression meaning “I could stay here.”
    This describes a place where you think you could stay for a long time or forever. It can be used as a sentence itself or combined with a phrase describing how long you want to stay.

    2- for alltid

    Then comes the phrase – “forever.”
    This indicates that they wish they could remain there forever.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Stranden var så deilig og sjøen blå!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “The beach was so lovely, and the ocean was so blue!”
    Use this expression to share your positive impressions of a location at the seaside.

    2- Håper dere kommer hjem brune og blide.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “I hope you come home tanned and happy.”
    Use this expression to show are feeling hopeful that the poster has enjoyed their stay in the sun.

    3- Husk solkrem! Dere er jo så bleke at dere kommer til å bli brente!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Remember sunscreen! You’re so pale that you’re going to burn!”
    Use this expression to be both funny and has concern for the health of the poster’s skin.

    4- Jeg liker best når det er overskyet.

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “I prefer it when it’s cloudy.”
    Use this expression to share your preference for cloudy weather. In this context, it could be a bit funny too.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å bli : “to stay”
  • sjø: “sea”
  • blå: “blue”
  • brun: “tan “
  • hvit: “white”
  • skyet: “cloudy”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Norwegian When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Anne returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Jeg skulle ønske ferien varte litt lengre…
    “I wish the vacation lasted a little longer…”

    1- Jeg skulle ønske

    First is an expression meaning “I wish.”
    This phrase is used to express a wish or desire.

    2- ferien varte litt lengre

    Then comes the phrase – “the vacation lasted a little longer.”
    Just like in English, in the sentence following the phrase “I wish,” the verb should be in the past tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ja, men nå må vi tilbake på jobb.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “Yes, but we need to go back to work.”
    Use this expression to remind the poster of the realities of work-life.

    2- Jeg håper dere nøt det så lenge det varte!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “I hope you enjoyed it while it lasted!”
    Use this expression if you’re hopeful that the poster enjoyed their stay.

    3- Jeg drar på guttetur i morgen jeg!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “I’m going on a lads trip in the morning!”
    Use this expression to share some of your own experiences.

    4- Jeg kommer bort med boller jeg nettopp bakte!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “I’ll come over with some sweet buns I just baked!”
    Use this expression to welcome the poster back with a gift of sweet buns.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • lang: “long”
  • tilbake: “back”
  • jobb: “work”
  • å dra: “to go”
  • gutt: “boy “
  • bolle: “bun”
  • å bake: “to bake”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as the Norwegian Constitution Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Norwegian

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Olav watches Constitution Day fireworks show, posts an image of the spectacle, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Gratulerer med dagen kjære landsmenn.
    “Dear compatriots, happy Constitution Day.”

    1- Gratulerer med dagen

    First is an expression meaning “Happy Constitution Day (lit. Happy birthday).”
    This phrase, directly translated into English, actually means “congratulations with the day.” Although it is mostly used to congratulate someone on their birthday, it is also used on other special occasions, such as Constitution Day, mothers/fathers day, etc.

    2- kjære landsmenn

    Then comes the phrase – “dear compatriots.”
    On Constitution Day, Norwegians usually feel quite patriotic. This expression is typically only used on this day.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hipp hipp hurra!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “Hip hip hooray!”
    Use this expression to show enthusiasm, and your agreement with the poster’s comment.

    2- Går dere i toget nå?

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Are you walking in the parade now?”
    Use this question if you want to know more about the immediate poster’s activities, if there’s a parade going on.

    3- I dag skal jeg spise mange is på pinne.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “Today I’m going to eat a lot of ice lollies.”
    Use this expression to share your dietary plans for the day.

    4- Gratulerer med dagen til deg og.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Happy Constitution Day to you too.”
    This is an old-fashioned, commonly used wish for Constitution Day.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Gratulerer med dagen.: “Happy birthday.”
  • hurra: “hooray”
  • tog: “train, parade”
  • is på pinne: “ice lolly”
  • å gratulere: “to congratulate”
  • å spise: “to eat “
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Constitution Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Norwegian

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Anne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of all the guests, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Tusen takk til alle som organiserte en herlig fest!
    “Thank you to all who organized the lovely party!”

    1- Tusen takk til alle

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you all.”
    This phrase is used to thank a group of people all at once.

    2- som organiserte en herlig fest

    Then comes the phrase – “who organized a lovely party.”
    “Herlig” is a Norwegian word that does not have a direct translation in English, but the meaning is the same as “lovely” or “wonderful.” It is used a lot by the younger generations to describe things they like.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ha en bra dag!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning – “Have a good day!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well for the day.

    2- Jeg håper året som kommer bringer like mye lykke og kjærlighet som det forrige!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “I hope the coming year brings as much happiness and love as the last one did! ”
    Use this expression to share a special wish for their next life year.

    3- Gratulerer med dagen kjære venn!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “Happy birthday, my dear friend!”
    This is the traditional birthday wish, together with a term of endearment for a good friend.

    4- Ikke lenge til du er gammel og skrukkete nå!

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “Not long until you’re old and wrinkled now!”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å organisere: “to organise”
  • herlig: “wonderful”
  • å ha: “to have “
  • venninne : “friend (girl)”
  • lenge: “long”
  • skrukkete: “wrinkled”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Norwegian

    Impress your friends with your Norwegian New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Olav celebrates the New Year, posts an image of the celebrations, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Godt nyttår! Nytt år, nye muligheter.
    “Happy New Year! New year, new possibilities. ”

    1- Godt nyttår

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year .”
    This is how one would greet people in the New Year. It is the traditional expression used on midnight of December 31st to January 1st.

    2- Nytt år, nye muligheter

    Then comes the phrase – “New year, new possibilities.”
    This is a phrase one uses to express the new opportunities in the coming year, often referring to things that can get better than they were.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Målet mitt i år er å holde meg til hvertfall ett av nyttårsforsettene mine!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning – “My goal this year is to stick to at least one of my New Year’s resolutions!”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    2- Jeg ønsker deg et godt år fremover.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “I wish you a good coming year.”
    Use this old-fashioned and simple, but appropriate phrase to wish someone a good year ahead.

    3- Det er jo bare enda en annen dag…

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “It’s just (yet) another day….”
    Use this expression if you are slightly sarcastic, but more funny.

    4- Jeg tror dette året kommer til å bli helt fantastisk! Skål!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning – “I think this year is going to be amazing! Cheers!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic and enthusiastic about the new year.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Godt Nyttår!: “Happy New Year!”
  • mål: “goal”
  • å ønske: “to wish “
  • fremover : “forward”
  • annen: “other”
  • skål: “cheers”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Norwegian

    What will you say in Norwegian about Christmas?

    Anne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the festivities, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    God jul alle sammen!
    “Merry Christmas, everyone!”

    1- God jul

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas.”
    This is the traditional Norwegian way to wish someone a Merry Christmas. It can be used before Christmas day as well.

    2- alle sammen

    Then comes the phrase – “everyone.”
    This can be literally translated to “all together.” It shows how Norwegians think of people being together in a group when addressing a group of people.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- God jul, kjære! Det var koselig å feire med din familie for første gang.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning – “Merry Christmas, dear! It was nice to celebrate together with your family for the first time. ”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful for a specific Christmas experience.

    2- Endelig en hvit jul.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “Finally, a white Christmas.”
    Use this phrase to share your implicit positive feelings about snow on Christmas day.

    3- Fikk du mye fint?

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “Did you get a lot of nice stuff?”
    Use this expression if you are somewhat humorous, but also curious.

    4- Ha en fortsatt god jul og nyttår!

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!”
    This is a traditional phrase of well-wishes over the Christmas and New Year season.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • God jul: “Merry Christmas”
  • kjære: “dear”
  • jul: “Christmas”
  • å få : “to get “
  • nyttår: “New Year”
  • fortsatt: “still”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Norwegian

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Norwegian phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Olav celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Gratulerer med bryllupsdagen, kjære Anne.
    “Dear Anne, happy anniversary.”

    1- Gratulerer med bryllupsdagen

    First is an expression meaning “happy anniversary”.
    In Norwegian, the expression used for wedding day and anniversary is the same, so the English meaning depends on the context.

    2- kjære Anne

    Then comes the phrase – “dear Anne.”
    Used in the same way as in English, the only difference is that, in Norwegian, this expression can be used at the beginning or the end of a sentence and still keep the same meaning.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Takk, og det samme til deg! Jeg elsker deg.

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning – “Thank you, and the same to you! I love you.”
    Use this expression to show you have similar feelings of love and gratitude as the poster.

    2- Dere to er så skjønne!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning – “You two are so adorable!”
    Use this observational comment to express your appreciation of a couple’s loving interaction.

    3- Gratulerer, og tillykke med resten av ekteskapet.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations, and happy returns for the rest of your marriage.”
    This is a slightly more serious and traditional well-wish for a couple on their wedding anniversary.

    4- Så, du har overlevd et helt år?

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning – “So, you’ve survived a whole year?”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous and want to use a bit of sarcasm too.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bryllupsdag: “anniversary”
  • Jeg elsker deg.: “I love you. “
  • skjønn: “beautiful”
  • to : “two “
  • tillykke: “good luck”
  • å overleve: “to survive”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Norwegian! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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