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Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Norwegian

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At NorwegianClass101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Norwegian Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Learn Norwegian Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Norwegian


1. Why Is It Important to Know Norwegian Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Norwegian culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, NorwegianClass101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Norway.

Here are some of the most important Norwegian vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Norwegian Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
familie
Great grandfather
oldefar
Mother
mor
Grandmother
bestemor
Father
far
Grandfather
bestefar
Wife
kone
Grandchild
barnebarn
Husband
mann
Granddaughter
barnebarn
Parent
partner
Grandson
barnebarn
Child
barn
Aunt
tante
Daughter
datter
Uncle
onkel
Sister
søster
Niece
niese
Brother
bror
Nephew
nevø
Younger sister
lillesøster
Younger brother
lillebror
Older brother
storebror
Great grandmother
oldemor
Cousin
søskenbarn
Mother-in-law
svigermor
Father-in-law
svigerfar
Sister-in-law
svigerinne
Brother-in-law
svoger
Partner
forelder

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Norwegian Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Norwegian language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Norwegian literature, or make use of ours!

Du velger ikke familien din. De er Guds gave til deg, som du er til dem.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Familie er ikke en viktig ting. Det er alt.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Familie betyr at ingen blir etterlatt eller glemt.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Min familie er min styrke og min svakhet.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Familien er et av naturens mesterverk.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Når problemer kommer, er det familien din som støtter deg.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Familien er den første viktig celle av det menneskelige samfunn.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Det finnes ikke noe slikt som moro for hele familien.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Du må forsvare din ære. Og din familie.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Alle lykkelige familier ligner hverandre, hver ulykkelige familie er ulykkelige på sin egen måte.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Norwegian vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. familie a. My male child
2. mor b. My older male sibling
3. far c. My female sibling
4. kone d. My child’s child
5. mann e. My child’s female child
6. forelder f. My female parent
7. barn g. My grandparent’s mother
8. datter h. Mother to one of my parents
9. sønn i. Relatives
10. søster j. My female child
11. bror k. My younger male sibling
12. lillesøster l. Male spouse
13. lillebror m. The father of one of my parents
14. storebror n. My child’s male child
15. oldemor o. My children’s father or mother
16. oldefar p. The sister of one of my parents
17. bestemor q. The brother of one of my parents
18. bestefar r. My male parent
19. barnebarn s. My sibling’s female child
20. barnebarn t. My sibling’s male child
21. barnebarn u. My male sibling
22. tante v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. onkel w. Female spouse
24. niese x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. nevø y. The person I am a parent to
26. søskenbarn z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at NorwegianClass101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Learn Norwegian Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Norwegian vocabulary!

NorwegianClass101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Norwegian easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Norwegian culture, including the Norwegian family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Norwegian word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Norwegian Key Phrase List
4 - A free Norwegian online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Norwegian Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Norwegian language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, NorwegianClass101 will be there every step of the way toward your Norwegian mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Norwegian

NorwegianClass101’s Essential Norwegian Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Norway. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at NorwegianClass101! Why don’t you take the time to study Norwegian travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Norwegian friends or travel guide with your flawless Norwegian!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Norwegian people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Norwegian phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Norwegian. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Norway will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Norwegian.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Norwegian, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Takk (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Norwegian.

2) Snakker du engelsk? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Går det en buss fra flyplassen til byen? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Er dette riktig buss til flyplassen? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Unnskyld meg, hva er billettprisen? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Jeg har en reservasjon (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Har dere noen ledige rom i kveld? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Hvor er togstasjonen? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Jeg er allergisk mot peanøtter (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Norwegian.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Norwegian on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Norwegian if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Har du noen vegetarretter? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Norwegian.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Kunne jeg fått et kart? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Hvor mye er dette? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Norwegian will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Tar dere kredittkort? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Er Wi-Fi gratis? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Kan du vær så snill å ta et bilde av meg? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Har dere noen anbefalinger? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Norwegian friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Jeg vil gjerne ha et røykfritt sete, takk (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Vann, er du snill (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Kan jeg få regningen? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Hva anbefaler du for en suvenir? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Norwegian? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

NorwegianClass101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Norwegian reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Norwegian word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Norwegian Key Phrase List
- A free Norwegian online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Norwegian Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Norwegian-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Norwegian speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Norwegian friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With NorwegianClass101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Norwegian Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Norway, using the correct Norwegian numbers for counting in Norwegian could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Norwegian Numbers?
  3. Learning Norwegian Numbers
  4. Why Choose NorwegianClass101 to Learn all about Norwegian Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Norwegian


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Norwegian Numbers?

For us at NorwegianClass101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Norway or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Norwegian Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Norwegian number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Norwegian numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Norwegian numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Norwegian speaker and friendly NorwegianClass101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Norwegian numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Norwegian number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Norwegian words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose NorwegianClass101 to Learn all about Norwegian Numbers?

NorwegianClass101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! NorwegianClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Norwegian!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Norwegian with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Norwegian dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about NorwegianClass101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Norwegian teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Norwegian word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Norwegian level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with NorwegianClass101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Norwegian numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Norwegian on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Norwegian, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Norwegian.

At Learn Norwegian, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Norwegian in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Norwegian

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Norwegian. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Olav eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Olav’s post.

God mat med godt selskap!
“Good food in good company!”

1- God mat

First is an expression meaning “Good food.”
This is a very basic phrase in Norwegian. You can use it to express, in a brief and effective way, that the food is tasty.

2- med godt selskap

Then comes the phrase - “with good company.”
This phrase is similar to the previous which uses the adjective meaning “good” and a noun. Notice that the adjective changes to the neuter form to agree with the noun gender. In general, you can use this expression to indicate that you are with good friends.

COMMENTS

In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

1- Hvorfor ble ikke jeg invitert?

His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Why wasn’t I invited? ”
Use this expression if you’re really upset about not being invited, or if you’re in a humorous mood and asks this question rhetorically.

2- Jeg håper gutta koser seg!

His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “I hope the guys are enjoying themselves!”
This is a friendly wish to the party, and a pleasant way to make small talk online.

3- Så koselig!

His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “How nice!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted about the poster’s experience.

4- Jeg ønsker dere en fin kveld. Hilsen Per

His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you a nice evening. Best, Per”
This is a slightly more stilted way of doing the same as Morten - expressing a friendly wish. In this instance, Per is clearly not used to social media, therefore he adds his name to the post.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • god: “good”
  • å invitere: “to invite”
  • å håpe: “to hope”
  • koselig: “nice, cozy”
  • kveld: “evening”
  • selskap: “company”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Norwegian restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Norwegian

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Norwegian phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Anne shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Søstershopping er det beste.
    “Shopping with your sister is the best.”

    1- Søstershopping

    First is an expression meaning “Sister-shopping .”
    This word would typically be used in a colloquial setting, such as social media, as it is a combination of the word “sister” and “shopping.” Many words that are usually written with a hyphen or as two words in English are written as one in Norwegian, like this word.

    2- er det beste

    Then comes the phrase - “is the best .”
    This phrase is very useful when you want to express what you like the most.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Kjøp forskjellige ting så vi kan se forskjell på dere!

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Buy different things so (that) we can see the difference between the two of you!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- Kjøp noe til meg?

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “Buy something for me?”
    Use this expression to start a conversation (questions are good that way), or if you feel slightly neglected!

    3- Ikke bruk for mye penger!

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t spend too much money!”
    This can be an expression of real concern, if the poster is a big spender. Or it could just be a comment to make conversation.

    4- God shopping!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Good shopping!”
    This is a warmhearted wish for a pleasant experience.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • best: “best”
  • å kjøpe: “to buy”
  • noe: “something”
  • penger: “money”
  • å shoppe: “to shop”
  • forskjell: “difference”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Norwegian

    Sporting events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Norwegian.

    Olav plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team playing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Volleyball på stranda er digg!
    “Volleyball on the beach is awesome!”

    1- Volleyball på stranda

    First is an expression meaning “Volleyball on the beach.”
    This phrase is stating in a simple manner both what is going on and where. Norwegians love to spend time at the beach during summer, as most of the time the weather is horrible. Volleyball, like many words, is borrowed directly from English and is spelled the same.

    2- er digg

    Then comes the phrase - “is awesome.”
    This phrase is a commonly used term, mostly amongst young people, which means the same as “awesome,” “sweet,” or “cool.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Er det fint nok vær til det da?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “Is the weather nice enough for that?”
    Use this expression if you feel pessimistic about the weather.

    2- Er det noen fine damer som er med?

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Are any pretty ladies joining in?”
    This is a remark that shows humour and perhaps a bit of teasing.

    3- Husk solkrem!

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Remember the sunscreen!”
    This is a suitable remark to make if you are worried about the poster’s wellbeing in the sun, but take care not to come across as a parent!

    4- Ikke få sand i munnen.

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t get sand in your mouth.”
    This is a good expression to use if you’re feeling humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strand: “beach”
  • vær: “weather”
  • dame: “lady”
  • solkrem: “sunscreen”
  • sand: “sand”
  • å huske: “to remember”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Norwegian

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Anne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Dette er det jeg kaller bra musikk!
    “This is what I call good music!”

    1- Dette er det jeg kaller

    First is an expression meaning “This is what I call .”
    In Norwegian, instead of simply stating that something is or isn’t good, we often use the phrase “This is what I call”, followed by a phrase.

    2- bra musikk

    Then comes the phrase - “good music .”
    This phrase is useful when you want to introduce your music preferences to your friends. You can substitute the word “music” with something else.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ja, den er fengende.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Yes, it’s catchy.”
    Use this expression to show that you agree with the poster’s comment.

    2- Jeg hører mer på de gamle klassikerne.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “I listen more to the (old) classics.”
    Use this expression to share an opposing personal opinion.

    3- Det var den vi hørte på festen her forleden.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “This was the one we heard at the party the other day.”
    Share a bit of personal information to warm up the conversation!

    4- Denne liker jeg også!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “I also like this! ”
    This is a commonly-used expression when you agree with someone’s taste in anything.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • musikk: “music”
  • fengende: “catchy”
  • gammel: “old”
  • fest: “party”
  • også: “also”
  • klassiker: “classic”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Norwegian Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers with in Norwegian!

    Olav goes to a concert, posts an image of the band on stage, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Øyafestivalen var fantastisk!
    “Øya festival was fantastic!”

    1- Øyafestivalen

    First is an expression meaning “Øya festival.”
    Øya festival, or in English “The Island festival,” is one of the biggest summer festivals in Norway. It is held annually in Oslo, usually in mid August.

    2- var fantastisk

    Then comes the phrase - “was fantastic.”
    Like many expressions used in the Norwegian language this one is a loanword, a word taken from a different language, in this case the English “fantastic.” This phrase is in the past tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du må ta meg med neste gang.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “You must take me with you next time. ”
    Use this expression to show your hope to be included in the party next time.

    2- All musikk nå er dårlig.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “All music now is bad. ”
    Use this expression with care! This is a rather negative opinion.

    3- Det er masse bra konserter nå om sommeren!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “There are a lot of good concerts (now) during summer!”
    In contrast with the previous comment, this one is a positive opinion.

    4- Jeg fikk dessverre ikke dratt dit i år…

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Unfortunately, I didn’t get to go there this year…”
    This comment is good to be part of a conversation, sharing a bit of personal information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • festival: “festival”
  • gang: “time”
  • konsert: “concert”
  • dårlig: “bad”
  • år: “year”
  • dessverre: “unfortunately”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Norwegian

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Norwegian phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Anne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Enda en knust telefon…
    “Another shattered phone…”

    1- Enda en

    First is an expression meaning “Another.”
    In Norwegian this expression can be used to mean both “another,” as in different, as well as “another one,” as in “I’ll have another one, please.”

    2- knust telefon

    Then comes the phrase - “broken phone.”
    With smartphones being as popular as they are in Norway, saying a phone is broken rarely means that the whole phone has stopped working. These days it is likely to mean that the screen is cracked or shattered.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du får bruke hustelefonen fremover.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “You can use a landline telephone from now on.”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    2- Jeg vet om et sted som fikser sånt for en billig penge!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “I know a place where they can fix things like that for a cheap price!”
    Use this expression if you want to be helpful.

    3- Jeg bruker ikke smarttelefon og mobiltelefonen min har vart meg lenge.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “I’m not using a smartphone and my mobile phone has lasted me a long time. ”
    Use this expression if you feel you have good advice to give.

    4- Om du har forsikring så er det ikke så dyrt å få den reparert.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “If you have insurance, it’s not too expensive to get it fixed.”
    This expression shows positive support and encouragement.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å knuse: “to break”
  • å bruke: “to use”
  • billig: “cheap”
  • mobiltelefon: “mobile phone”
  • forsikring: “insurance”
  • hustelefon: “landline”
  • dyr: “expensive”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to talk about an accident in Norwegian. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Norwegian

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Norwegian!

    Olav gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg kjeder meg sånn. Hva kan jeg finne på?
    “I’m so bored. What can I do? ”

    1- Jeg kjeder meg sånn.

    First is an expression meaning “I’m so bored. .”
    Being bored is not expressed as a state of being in Norwegian. Rather, it is expressed as a verb. “I am boring myself” would be the most direct translation. Its meaning, however, is exactly that of the English “I am bored.”

    2- Hva kan jeg finne på?

    Then comes the phrase - “What can I do?.”
    A literal translation of this question, often asked to oneself, is “what can I find to do?” Norwegians will often express both boredom and wanting to find something to do out loud - sometimes, even if alone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du kan gå en tur i finværet?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “You can go for a walk in this nice weather?”
    Use this expression if you want to give advice.

    2- Bli med å ta en øl!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Come and grab a beer!”
    Use this expression if you want to make a suggestion to alleviate the poster’s problem.

    3- Plukk opp en god bok.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Pick up a good book. ”
    This is another suggestion to remedy the problem of boredom.

    4- Vask huset så blir din samboer glad.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “Clean the house and your partner will be happy.”
    This is a slightly sarcastic, mostly humorous suggestion to use.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å kjede seg: “to be bored”
  • tur: “walk”
  • øl: “beer”
  • å plukke: “to pick”
  • å vaske: “to wash/ to clean”
  • samboer: “cohabitant”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Norwegian

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Norwegian about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Anne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    I dag er jeg helt utslitt.
    “I’m completely exhausted today.”

    1- I dag er jeg

    First is an expression meaning “Today I am.”
    This part of the sentence is there to show that this is a state lasting or caused by the whole previous day, and is not just present at the moment. You can change the indication of time to refer to a different period, such as “this week”, “this morning,” and so on.

    2- helt utslitt

    Then comes the phrase - “completely exhausted.”
    The direct translation of this expression is “completely worn out,” but it also means the same as “exhausted.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lag deg en kopp te og slapp av!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Make yourself a cup of tea and relax!”
    Use this expression to make a positive suggestion.

    2- Se på komedie! Det vil nok muntre deg opp.

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Watch a comedy! That’ll cheer you up.”
    This is another suggestion that should be helpful to help with fatigue.

    3- Du har jo en lett jobb!

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “You have an easy job!”
    This is a somewhat sarcastic but mostly humorous comment.

    4- Nå må du ikke stresse for mye.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t get too stressed out. ”
    This phrase and suggestion shows caring and concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • utslitt: “exhausted”
  • te: “tea”
  • komedie: “comedy”
  • lett: “easy”
  • mye: “much, a lot”
  • kopp: “cup”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you also know how to say you’re exhausted in Norwegian! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Norwegian

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Norwegian.

    Olav suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg ødela kneet på treningssenteret.
    “I busted my knee at the gym. ”

    1- Jeg ødela kneet

    First is an expression meaning “I busted my knee”.
    Although the literal translation of this expression is “I broke the knee,” it is implied that you are referring to “my knee.” This phrase does not necessarily imply a permanent or serious injury.

    2- på treningssenteret

    Then comes the phrase - “at the gym.”
    This shows the location and implies this happened during physical training at the gym. You can keep the same preposition and name a different place to refer to somewhere else.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Å nei, skal vi til legen?

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no, should we go to the emergency room? ”
    Use this suggestion to show you are feeling concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    2- God bedring!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Get well soon!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well. It is very commonly used and well known.

    3- Jeg håper du har en god sofa.

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you have a good couch. ”
    Use this expression to show a bit of humour in a bleak situation.

    4- Det blir nok fort bedre, så sporty som du er!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “As sporty as you are, it’ll heal soon.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling optimistic about the poster’s prospects of healing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å ødelegge: “to destroy”
  • lege: “doctor”
  • God bedring!: “Get well soon!”
  • sofa: “couch”
  • fort: “fast”
  • kne: “knee”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Norwegian

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Anne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Å nei, jeg håpet på fint vær idag!
    “Oh no, I was hoping for nice weather today!”

    1- Å nei, jeg håpet

    First is an expression meaning “Oh no, I had hoped.”
    This is a simple expression stating that the speaker is disappointed and had previously hoped for something. It is often used when something does not turn out the way one wanted it to. It is usually used when there is a reason to hope for or expect something and is used mostly on social media, but is rarely written in more formal text.

    2- på fint vær idag

    Then comes the phrase - “for nice weather today..”
    In this case, the speaker had hoped that today’s weather would be nice, but you can substitute “nice weather” with a different expression.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Finnes ikke dårlig vær, bare dårlige klær.

    Her boyfriend, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing. (Norwegian idiom) ”
    This is a somewhat humorous expression to use related to the weather.

    2- Du får kose deg inne i stedet da.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll have to have a cozy time inside instead then.”
    This is a suggestion showing perhaps that the poster could make the best of a bad situation.

    3- Dårlig vær bygger karakter.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Bad weather builds character.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling slightly humorous.

    4- Håper det blir fint etter hvert.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “Hope it will clear up eventually.”
    Use this phrase if you want to wish for something good regarding the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vær: “weather”
  • dårlig: “bad”
  • inne: “inside”
  • deg: “you “
  • fint: “fine”
  • etter hvert: “eventually”
  • How would you comment in Norwegian when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Norwegian

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Olav changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    I et forhold med Anne.
    “In a relationship with Anne.”

    1- I et forhold

    First is an expression meaning “In a relationship.”
    This statement expresses the speaker’s state of being in a romantic relationship. It can also stand alone as a sentence by itself, where it will mean “in a relationship.”

    2- med Anne

    Then comes the phrase - “with Anne.”
    This simply shows that Anne is the person with whom the speaker is in a romantic relationship.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg elsker deg.

    His girlfriend, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “I love you.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling loving.

    2- Gratulerer!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is a common response to a positive announcement.

    3- Olav har endelig fått seg dame!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Olav finally got a girlfriend!”
    This is a humorous comment that teases the poster a bit.

    4- Det var en hyggelig nyhet.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “This is pleasant news. ”
    Use this expression if you are feeling positive about the news.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • forhold: “relationship”
  • å elske: “to love”
  • å gratulere: “to congratulate”
  • endelig: “finally”
  • hyggelig: “pleasant”
  • nyhet: “news”
  • What would you say in Norwegian when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Norwegian

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Norwegian.

    Anne is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    I dag skal jeg gifte meg!
    “Today I’m getting married!”

    1- I dag skal jeg

    First is an expression meaning “Today I am going to.”
    This states something the speaker is intending to do today. It can be used for both something that will be a day-long activity or something shorter taking place sometime today.

    2- gifte meg

    Then comes the phrase - “get married.”
    In Norwegian, this is expressed literally as “to marry oneself.” It is a reflexive verb. The meaning, however, is the same as the English “to get married.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg gleder meg til seremonien.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “I’m looking forward to the ceremony.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted about attending the wedding.

    2- Nå blir det fest!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Now, let’s party!”
    Make this humorous suggestion if you feel exuberant and positive about the news.

    3- Du kommer til å se så fin ut i den kjolen Anne!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “You’re going to look so nice in that dress, Anne!”
    Say this if you mean to compliment the bride on her choice of wedding dress.

    4- Du slår deg ned allerede?

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “You’re settling down already?”
    Use this expression if you feel humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å gifte seg : “to marry”
  • seremoni: “ceremony”
  • å bli: “to become”
  • kjole: “dress”
  • å slå seg ned: “to settle down”
  • å glede seg: “to look forward to “
  • How would you respond in Norwegian to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Norwegian

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Norwegian.

    Olav finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of a pregnant Anne, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Jeg skal bli pappa!
    “I’m going to be a dad!”

    1- Jeg skal bli

    First is an expression meaning “I’m going to be.”
    This expresses that the speaker is going to experience a change of state and is a common phrase in Norwegian. You can also use it when you talk about your future career, where you will state the occupation after this phrase.

    2- pappa

    Then comes the phrase - “a dad.”
    In this case, the new state of being is as a father. “Pappa” is a colloquial word, much like the English “dad.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Du må fortsatt bli med meg ut på byen, min venn!

    His college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “My friend, you still need to go out on the town with me!”
    Use this expression if you are in a frivolous mood and want to be humorous.

    2- Dette var hjertevarmende nyheter!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “This was heartwarming news!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and pleased about the news.

    3- Det gikk fort!

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “That went fast!”
    Use this expression to be slightly sarcastic and humorous.

    4- Jeg håper barnet vil ligne på Anne!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “I hope the child will look like Anne!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pappa: “dad”
  • by: “city”
  • hjertevarmende: “heartwarming”
  • fort: “fast/quick”
  • å ligne: “to resemble”
  • barn: “child”
  • å måtte: “to have to “
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Norwegian Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Norwegian.

    Anne plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Se på dette nydelige smilet!
    “Look at this lovely smile!”

    1- Se på dette

    First is an expression meaning “Look at this .”
    This is an expression often used to draw attention to something positive or nice.

    2- nydelige smilet

    Then comes the phrase - “lovely smile.”
    This is a standard way of complimenting a smile.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ta kontakt om dere trenger en barnevakt!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Let me know if you need a babysitter!”
    Use this expression to show your support and willingness to help.

    2- Hun blir nok snill og smart, som foreldrene sine.

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “She will probably be kind and smart, like her parents.”
    Use this expression to compliment the parents.

    3- Så flott hun er!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “She is so beautiful!”
    Use this expression to compliment someone’s looks.

    4- Jeg er veldig stolt!

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “I am so proud!”
    Use this expression if you feel proud about something.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • smil: “smile”
  • nydelig: “lovely, gorgeous”
  • smart: “smart”
  • barnevakt: “babysitter”
  • stolt: “proud”
  • veldig: “very “
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Norwegian! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Norwegian Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Olav goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Da er familien samlet igjen hos mor og far.
    “The family is gathered again at mom and dad’s place.”

    1- Da er familien samlet igjen

    First is an expression meaning “The family is gathered again.”
    This is a common expression for when a family is rarely together at once in one place.

    2- hos mor og far

    Then comes the phrase - “at mom and dad’s place.”
    Directly translated this means “at mom and dad,” but the English translation becomes “at mom and dad’s place,” as the location is implied rather than specified.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Det var et utrolig koselig besøk!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “That was a very nice visit!”
    Use this expression if you also want to comment on the event.

    2- Olav, familiemedlemmene dine ser så like ut jeg klarer ikke se forskjell!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Olav, your family members look so similar I can’t tell the difference!”
    Use this expression if you want to be humorous.

    3- Du må hilse så mye til dine foreldre.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Give your parents my regards.”
    This is a standard, polite phrase to use if you wish to greet the poster’s parents via the poster.

    4- Dette må være den beste måten å nyte sommeren.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “This must be the best way to enjoy summer.”
    Use this expression if you want to comment positively on the event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • familie: “family”
  • familiemedlem: “family member”
  • besøk: “parent”
  • besøk: “visit”
  • forskjell: “difference”
  • å nyte: “to enjoy”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Norwegian

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Norwegian about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Anne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of the boarding gate, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Nå er vi ved utgangen og venter på flyet.
    “We are now at the gate, waiting for our flight.”

    1- Nå er vi ved utgangen

    First is an expression meaning “We are now at the gate.”
    In Norwegian, the word indicating the gate that leads to a plane in an airport actually means “exit.”

    2- og venter på flyet

    Then comes the phrase - “waiting for the flight.”
    Since the sentence starts with “now,” it is important to keep all the verbs in the sentence in the present tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- God tur!

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Have a good trip!”
    Use this expression to greet someone in an old-fashioned way.

    2- Hvor skal dere?

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you going?”
    Use this expression if you’re curious about someone’s travel destination.

    3- Norge er vel bra nok, hvorfor dra noe annet sted?

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “Surely Norway is good enough, so why go somewhere else?”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous, teasing mood.

    4- Jeg tror dere kommer til å ha en super tur.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “I think you’re going to have a great trip.”
    Use this phrase to express your optimistic hopes for someone’s trip.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • utgang: “exit, gate”
  • god: “good”
  • hvor: “where”
  • hvorfor: “why”
  • annen: “other”
  • å tro: “to believe”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Norwegian!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Norwegian

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Norwegian phrases!

    Olav finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Nå skal vi prøve ut mye nytt!
    “Now, we’re going to try out a lot of new things!”

    1- Nå skal vi prøve ut

    First is an expression meaning: “Now we’re going to try out.”
    A useful expression for stating that one intends to do something new, something one hasn’t experienced before.

    2- mye nytt

    Then comes the phrase - “a lot of new things.”
    This phrase directly translated simply means “a lot of new,” but the English meaning is “a lot of new things.” It can be used for both objects and happenings.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mye var bra, og noe var litt merkelig…

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “A lot was good, but some of it was a bit weird…”
    Use this phrase to express your ambivalent feelings about something.

    2- Det er alltid bra med litt forandring i hverdagen.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “It’s always good to have some variety in life.”
    Use this expression to share a stoic philosophy about life.

    3- Dere fortjener å kose dere masse!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “You deserve to enjoy yourselves (so much)!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted and generous towards the travellers.

    4- Man lærer alltid nye ting av å reise en ny plass.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “One always learns so much from traveling to a new place.”
    Use this expression to share your idea of the virtues of traveling.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å prøve: “to try”
  • mye: “much”
  • forandring: “change”
  • å fortjene: “to deserve”
  • alltid: “always”
  • ny: “new”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Norwegian

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Norwegian, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Anne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Dette er noe av det flotteste jeg noensinne har sett!
    “This is one of the most beautiful things I’ve seen!”

    1- Dette er noe av det flotteste

    First is an expression meaning “This is one of the most beautiful things.”
    In this phrase, “the” and the adjective in the phrase have to be conjugated according to the noun in question.

    2- jeg noensinne har sett

    Then comes the phrase - “I have ever seen.”
    This phrase can be used when describing the worst/best/weirdest/etc. thing you have ever seen.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jeg er helt enig.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “I agree completely.”
    Use this expression if you agree full-heartedly with the poster.

    2- Fikk dere tatt mange bilder så jeg kan se senere?

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Did you take many pictures so that I can see later?”
    Use this expression if you are eager to see any photos the poster might have taken.

    3- Kult!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Cool!”
    Use this expression just so give a positive comment, showing your enthusiasm for whatever the poster shared.

    4- Jeg håper jeg også får tatt turen dit en dag.

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “I hope I get the chance to travel there someday too.”
    Use this expression to share your personal hopes for traveling to a specific location.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • noe: “something”
  • å være enig: “to agree”
  • bilde: “picture”
  • kul: “cool”
  • dere: “you “
  • tur: “trip”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Norwegian

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Norwegian!

    Olav relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Her kan jeg bli for alltid!
    “I could stay here forever!”

    1- Her kan jeg bli

    First is an expression meaning “I could stay here.”
    This describes a place where you think you could stay for a long time or forever. It can be used as a sentence itself or combined with a phrase describing how long you want to stay.

    2- for alltid

    Then comes the phrase - “forever.”
    This indicates that they wish they could remain there forever.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Stranden var så deilig og sjøen blå!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “The beach was so lovely, and the ocean was so blue!”
    Use this expression to share your positive impressions of a location at the seaside.

    2- Håper dere kommer hjem brune og blide.

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you come home tanned and happy.”
    Use this expression to show are feeling hopeful that the poster has enjoyed their stay in the sun.

    3- Husk solkrem! Dere er jo så bleke at dere kommer til å bli brente!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Remember sunscreen! You’re so pale that you’re going to burn!”
    Use this expression to be both funny and has concern for the health of the poster’s skin.

    4- Jeg liker best når det er overskyet.

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “I prefer it when it’s cloudy.”
    Use this expression to share your preference for cloudy weather. In this context, it could be a bit funny too.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å bli : “to stay”
  • sjø: “sea”
  • blå: “blue”
  • brun: “tan “
  • hvit: “white”
  • skyet: “cloudy”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Norwegian When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Anne returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Jeg skulle ønske ferien varte litt lengre…
    “I wish the vacation lasted a little longer…”

    1- Jeg skulle ønske

    First is an expression meaning “I wish.”
    This phrase is used to express a wish or desire.

    2- ferien varte litt lengre

    Then comes the phrase - “the vacation lasted a little longer.”
    Just like in English, in the sentence following the phrase “I wish,” the verb should be in the past tense.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ja, men nå må vi tilbake på jobb.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “Yes, but we need to go back to work.”
    Use this expression to remind the poster of the realities of work-life.

    2- Jeg håper dere nøt det så lenge det varte!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you enjoyed it while it lasted!”
    Use this expression if you’re hopeful that the poster enjoyed their stay.

    3- Jeg drar på guttetur i morgen jeg!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “I’m going on a lads trip in the morning!”
    Use this expression to share some of your own experiences.

    4- Jeg kommer bort med boller jeg nettopp bakte!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll come over with some sweet buns I just baked!”
    Use this expression to welcome the poster back with a gift of sweet buns.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • lang: “long”
  • tilbake: “back”
  • jobb: “work”
  • å dra: “to go”
  • gutt: “boy “
  • bolle: “bun”
  • å bake: “to bake”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as the Norwegian Constitution Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Norwegian

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Olav watches Constitution Day fireworks show, posts an image of the spectacle, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Gratulerer med dagen kjære landsmenn.
    “Dear compatriots, happy Constitution Day.”

    1- Gratulerer med dagen

    First is an expression meaning “Happy Constitution Day (lit. Happy birthday).”
    This phrase, directly translated into English, actually means “congratulations with the day.” Although it is mostly used to congratulate someone on their birthday, it is also used on other special occasions, such as Constitution Day, mothers/fathers day, etc.

    2- kjære landsmenn

    Then comes the phrase - “dear compatriots.”
    On Constitution Day, Norwegians usually feel quite patriotic. This expression is typically only used on this day.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hipp hipp hurra!

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Hip hip hooray!”
    Use this expression to show enthusiasm, and your agreement with the poster’s comment.

    2- Går dere i toget nå?

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Are you walking in the parade now?”
    Use this question if you want to know more about the immediate poster’s activities, if there’s a parade going on.

    3- I dag skal jeg spise mange is på pinne.

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “Today I’m going to eat a lot of ice lollies.”
    Use this expression to share your dietary plans for the day.

    4- Gratulerer med dagen til deg og.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Constitution Day to you too.”
    This is an old-fashioned, commonly used wish for Constitution Day.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Gratulerer med dagen.: “Happy birthday.”
  • hurra: “hooray”
  • tog: “train, parade”
  • is på pinne: “ice lolly”
  • å gratulere: “to congratulate”
  • å spise: “to eat “
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Constitution Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Norwegian

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Anne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of all the guests, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    Tusen takk til alle som organiserte en herlig fest!
    “Thank you to all who organized the lovely party!”

    1- Tusen takk til alle

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you all.”
    This phrase is used to thank a group of people all at once.

    2- som organiserte en herlig fest

    Then comes the phrase - “who organized a lovely party.”
    “Herlig” is a Norwegian word that does not have a direct translation in English, but the meaning is the same as “lovely” or “wonderful.” It is used a lot by the younger generations to describe things they like.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ha en bra dag!

    Her college friend, Morten, uses an expression meaning - “Have a good day!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well for the day.

    2- Jeg håper året som kommer bringer like mye lykke og kjærlighet som det forrige!

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “I hope the coming year brings as much happiness and love as the last one did! ”
    Use this expression to share a special wish for their next life year.

    3- Gratulerer med dagen kjære venn!

    Her friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday, my dear friend!”
    This is the traditional birthday wish, together with a term of endearment for a good friend.

    4- Ikke lenge til du er gammel og skrukkete nå!

    Her high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “Not long until you’re old and wrinkled now!”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • å organisere: “to organise”
  • herlig: “wonderful”
  • å ha: “to have “
  • venninne : “friend (girl)”
  • lenge: “long”
  • skrukkete: “wrinkled”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Norwegian

    Impress your friends with your Norwegian New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Olav celebrates the New Year, posts an image of the celebrations, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Godt nyttår! Nytt år, nye muligheter.
    “Happy New Year! New year, new possibilities. ”

    1- Godt nyttår

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year .”
    This is how one would greet people in the New Year. It is the traditional expression used on midnight of December 31st to January 1st.

    2- Nytt år, nye muligheter

    Then comes the phrase - “New year, new possibilities.”
    This is a phrase one uses to express the new opportunities in the coming year, often referring to things that can get better than they were.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Målet mitt i år er å holde meg til hvertfall ett av nyttårsforsettene mine!

    His high school friend, Mette, uses an expression meaning - “My goal this year is to stick to at least one of my New Year’s resolutions!”
    Use this expression if you’re in a humorous mood.

    2- Jeg ønsker deg et godt år fremover.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you a good coming year.”
    Use this old-fashioned and simple, but appropriate phrase to wish someone a good year ahead.

    3- Det er jo bare enda en annen dag…

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “It’s just (yet) another day….”
    Use this expression if you are slightly sarcastic, but more funny.

    4- Jeg tror dette året kommer til å bli helt fantastisk! Skål!

    His friend, Julie, uses an expression meaning - “I think this year is going to be amazing! Cheers!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic and enthusiastic about the new year.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Godt Nyttår!: “Happy New Year!”
  • mål: “goal”
  • å ønske: “to wish “
  • fremover : “forward”
  • annen: “other”
  • skål: “cheers”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Norwegian

    What will you say in Norwegian about Christmas?

    Anne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the festivities, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anne’s post.

    God jul alle sammen!
    “Merry Christmas, everyone!”

    1- God jul

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas.”
    This is the traditional Norwegian way to wish someone a Merry Christmas. It can be used before Christmas day as well.

    2- alle sammen

    Then comes the phrase - “everyone.”
    This can be literally translated to “all together.” It shows how Norwegians think of people being together in a group when addressing a group of people.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- God jul, kjære! Det var koselig å feire med din familie for første gang.

    Her husband, Olav, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas, dear! It was nice to celebrate together with your family for the first time. ”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful for a specific Christmas experience.

    2- Endelig en hvit jul.

    Her neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “Finally, a white Christmas.”
    Use this phrase to share your implicit positive feelings about snow on Christmas day.

    3- Fikk du mye fint?

    Her nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “Did you get a lot of nice stuff?”
    Use this expression if you are somewhat humorous, but also curious.

    4- Ha en fortsatt god jul og nyttår!

    Her supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!”
    This is a traditional phrase of well-wishes over the Christmas and New Year season.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • God jul: “Merry Christmas”
  • kjære: “dear”
  • jul: “Christmas”
  • å få : “to get “
  • nyttår: “New Year”
  • fortsatt: “still”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Norwegian

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Norwegian phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Olav celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Olav’s post.

    Gratulerer med bryllupsdagen, kjære Anne.
    “Dear Anne, happy anniversary.”

    1- Gratulerer med bryllupsdagen

    First is an expression meaning “happy anniversary”.
    In Norwegian, the expression used for wedding day and anniversary is the same, so the English meaning depends on the context.

    2- kjære Anne

    Then comes the phrase - “dear Anne.”
    Used in the same way as in English, the only difference is that, in Norwegian, this expression can be used at the beginning or the end of a sentence and still keep the same meaning.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Olav’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Takk, og det samme til deg! Jeg elsker deg.

    His wife, Anne, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you, and the same to you! I love you.”
    Use this expression to show you have similar feelings of love and gratitude as the poster.

    2- Dere to er så skjønne!

    His neighbor, Hanne, uses an expression meaning - “You two are so adorable!”
    Use this observational comment to express your appreciation of a couple’s loving interaction.

    3- Gratulerer, og tillykke med resten av ekteskapet.

    His supervisor, Per, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations, and happy returns for the rest of your marriage.”
    This is a slightly more serious and traditional well-wish for a couple on their wedding anniversary.

    4- Så, du har overlevd et helt år?

    His nephew, Anders, uses an expression meaning - “So, you’ve survived a whole year?”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous and want to use a bit of sarcasm too.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bryllupsdag: “anniversary”
  • Jeg elsker deg.: “I love you. “
  • skjønn: “beautiful”
  • to : “two “
  • tillykke: “good luck”
  • å overleve: “to survive”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Norwegian! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Norwegian

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    Learn how to apologize in Norwegian - fast and accurately! NorwegianClass101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Norwegian Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Norwegian
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Norwegian
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Norwegian through NorwegianClass101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Norwegian

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Norwegian. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Unnskyld.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Norwegian or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Jeg vil gjerne be om unnskyldning.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Norwegian. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Jeg beklager så mye.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Jeg skal ikke gjøre det igjen.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Jeg skal sørge for å ikke gjøre denne feilen på nytt.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    Jeg mente det ikke.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Det er min skyld.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Jeg beklager for å være så egoistisk.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Jeg håper du tilgir meg.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Jeg tar fullt ansvar.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Jeg burde ikke ha gjort det.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Sorry at jeg gir deg pengene tilbake sent.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Vær så snill og ikke bli sint på meg.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Beklager at jeg er sen.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Jeg beklager for å være slem mot deg.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Norwegian

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Norwegian! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at NorwegianClass101 about how to use the correct Norwegian words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Norwegian? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Norwegian. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Norwegian through NorwegianClass101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! NorwegianClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Norwegian!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Norwegian with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Norwegian dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about NorwegianClass101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Norwegian teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Norwegian word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Norwegian level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Norwegian, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in NorwegianClass101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Norwegian!

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    Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Norwegian

    Thumbnail

    Do you talk with strangers?

    If you’ve been to Norway before, or are currently in Norway, you’ve probably noticed that the Norwegian people are pretty informal and casual overall. That is, when you actually get to know them.

    Norwegians are known for seeming cold towards strangers. Even after you’ve mastered saying “my name is,” in Norwegian and other introductory sayings, it’s normal to not know the name or age—or anything—about a person you’ve taken the bus with over multiple years!

    If you do approach a stranger, there’s a big chance you’ll get a strange look instead of a friendly smile. However, this doesn’t mean that Norwegian people are actually cold. Yes, the weather might be cold. But as a people, Norwegians are warm and friendly.

    Women Walking Together in Snow

    If you’re in Norway for business, you’ll quickly understand that the hierarchy present in other countries doesn’t exist in Norwegian workplaces, for the most part. It’s not unusual to address your boss similar to how you would a friend. Still, Norwegians have formal ways of speaking and writing, but in daily life it’s not commonly used.

    This article will teach you the common and natural ways of introducing yourself in Norwegian. Like in all languages, there are different greetings and ways to introduce yourself, depending on the situation and environment you’re in. They might even change depending on where in the country you are! Don’t worry about this, though, as you’ll be understood no matter where you are in Norway by the time you finish our article!

    Table of Contents

    1. How to Greet Others in Norwegian
    2. How to Use “How are You?” in Norwegian
    3. Asking and Saying Your Name
    4. Asking and Saying Your Age
    5. Asking and Telling Where You’re From
    6. Saying Why You’re in Norway
    7. How NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Learn Even More Norwegian!

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    1. How to Greet Others in Norwegian

    First Encounter

    Greetings in Norwegian are usually informal and friendly. There are many ways to greet others in Norwegian, and here we’ll go through some of the more common ones. Most of them have longer and shorter versions, and the shorter ones are more friendly and natural to use. For the most part, it’s recommended to use the informal greetings unless you’ve just met each other.

    In the following sections, we’ll go over some common greetings and how they’re used; when introducing yourself in Norwegian, grammar is important for even the simplest greetings.

    1- Greeting Friends and Acquaintances

    When greeting friends, this is mostly done the informal way. However, as mentioned earlier, there are both longer and shorter versions of most greetings. Here, the longer version is formal, while the shorter one is informal. Also take note that greetings change depending on the age of the person you’re talking to. This is not a rule, but if you speak with older people, you’ll notice that they often use the formal way of greeting.

    Let’s take a look at a greeting mostly used with older or adult people you don’t know yet.

    Formal Greeting
    Hei, hyggelig å møte deg! “Hi, nice to meet you!”

    Informal Greeting
    Hei, hyggelig! “Hi, nice to meet you!”

    Both of these greetings mean the same thing. The formal greeting translates directly in English, but the informal greeting translates directly to “Hi, nice!” These two greetings are usually accompanied by a handshake. Both the formal and informal greetings are polite. It’s recommended to use one of these greetings when you’re meeting people you don’t know yet, or acquaintances of friends.

    Now, let’s jump into the most common ways to greet friends.

    These greetings are short and simple, and will remind you of the English ways of greeting friends. Most of these are informal and casual, as it’s very rare to greet friends in a formal way. Typically, a friendly hello in Norwegian does the trick. When you learn to introduce yourself in Norwegian, vocabulary is essential; these phrases serve as excellent building blocks for more elaborate greetings!

    Informal
    Hei! “Hi!”
    Heisann! “Hi!”
    Hallo! “Hello!”
    Halla! “Hello!”
    Nei, er det deg? “No, is it you?”

    Formal
    Hyggelig å se deg! “Nice to see you!”

    Woman Waving to Someone in Distance

    One of the above greetings probably peaked your interest, or maybe even confused you a little. The greeting Nei, er det deg? probably sounds strange in English. It’s common in Norway to add Nei in front of certain sentences, greetings, and goodbyes. This does not make the sentence negative. It’s used as an opening for the sentence, and is said in a happy tone. This kind of greeting with Nei in front of it is very common to use for older people, and it’s usually a fun and familiar way to greet someone.

    Both Heisann and Hei mean the same thing. Heisann is just a longer way of saying it, mostly used when you didn’t expect to see your friend. Hallo and Halla both mean “Hello,” though keep in mind that Halla is more of a slang word, commonly used among younger people.

    When it comes to the formal greeting, Hyggelig å se deg simply means “Nice to see you,” and is a very friendly way of greeting someone you know.

    2- Greeting Colleagues

    If you’re working or doing business in Norway, it’s important to note that the work environment is casual in most places. This means that the hierarchy in the workplace isn’t as noticeable as in other countries. At times, it can even be difficult to know who the boss is! Greetings in the workplace are often the same as greetings for friends, or similar to those used with acquaintances. Here’s how you’ll typically say “hello'’ and “nice to meet you” in Norwegian in the workplace.

    Formal
    Hei, hyggelig å treffe deg. “Hi, nice to meet you.”
    God dag. “Good day.”

    Informal
    Hallo “Hello”
    Hei “Hi”

    A new greeting in Norwegian is mentioned here, God dag, meaning “Good day.” This is a very formal way of greeting someone and is rarely used. However, you’ll probably encounter it at least once in a workplace, and it’s normal to reply with the same greeting. The rest of the greetings are similar to how one greets friends and acquaintances.

    Hei, hyggelig å treffe deg means the same as Hei, hyggelig å møte deg. The only difference is that treffe is used instead of møte. These words mean the same thing, but carry different weight. Treffe carries more weight compared to møte and therefore sounds more polite, even though both are formal.

    3- Greeting Strangers

    Introducing Yourself

    Greeting strangers in Norwegian isn’t done often. There are some places in Norway, usually more rural areas, where greeting strangers is more common. There are no special greetings for this, and the simple “Hello” or “Hi” is normal to use.

    4- Greetings Depending on the Time of Day

    Good Morning Cartoon

    In Norwegian, there are greetings that depend on the time of day. The times used for these greetings are morning, midday, afternoon, and evening.

    A fun fact is that all of these can both be used as greetings and goodbyes. If you want to say goodbye with these greetings, you simply add Ha which means “Have,” in front of the greeting.

    So, let’s take a look at more time-specific greetings. As you learn to introduce yourself in Norwegian, phrases like this are immensely helpful.

    Morning - Normally used from 7am to 10am.
    God morgen! “Good morning!”

    Midday - Normally used from 10am to 2pm.
    God formiddag! “Good morning!”

    Afternoon - Normally used from 2pm to 6pm.
    God ettermiddag! “Good afternoon!”

    Evening - Normally used from 6pm and out.
    God kveld! “Good evening!”

    In Norwegian, there is a greeting for “midday” or “noon.” In English, the equivalent is “morning.” The times for when to use these greetings are not set in stone. It’s not unusual to say “good morning” if you wake up late, for example at noon or one o’clock. Just use what you feel is most natural to use depending on the time of the day. For example, some people consider the evening to start later or earlier than six o’clock.

    Note that God natt, meaning “Good night,” is not used unless you’re going to bed.


    2. How to Use “How are You?” in Norwegian

    Something a lot of people are confused about when learning to greet people in Norwegian is the lack of the question “How are you?” When this question is used in Norwegian, it’s used as a genuine question and not just a greeting. You can ask this in a greeting, but you have to note that if you ask this in Norwegian, you will get a genuine answer. This means that you’ll have to prepare for either a positive or negative answer.

    Obviously, there are always exceptions to the rule. The answer you get can depend on your relationship with the person you’re asking. If you don’t really know them, there’s a chance of you getting the polite Det går bra, meaning “I’m fine.”

    However, when asking a friend, or even a colleague, you’ll usually get a long answer. If you ask someone Hvordan går det? which means “How are you?” and they’re having a bad day, you’ll hear about it. If you’re not prepared or interested in their answer, it’s better to avoid the question.

    This also affects you if you’re the one being asked. If a Norwegian asks you this question, they actually wonder or care about how you’re feeling. We’ll talk more about how to answer further down.

    1- How to Ask Someone “How are You?” in Norwegian

    Woman Chatting Over Drinks

    Hvordan går det? “How are you?”
    Hvordan har du det? “How are you (feeling)?”

    These ways of asking “How are you?” are used in both formal and informal situations. The latter, Hvordan har du det? sounds more like a personal question. Directly translated, it means “How are you feeling?” but it’s still used in all situations. The most commonly used is Hvordan går det?

    2- How to Answer “How are You?” in Norwegian

    Now, here comes the tricky part. How you answer this question totally depends on you and what you’re comfortable with. It’s okay to answer with a simple Det går bra, but some might take this as you being cold towards them.

    Below are a few common ways to answer, depending on your mood. You’ll see that Norwegian people often start with the simple Det går bra or similar answers, but almost always add a sentence or two (or even more) about how they’re feeling that particular day.

    Let’s take a look at how to start off the sentence when answering this question.

    Positive
    Det går bra. “It’s fine.”
    Jeg har det fint. “I’m fine.”
    Joda, bra her. “Sure, all good here.”
    Nei, går flott her. “No, everything is great here.”
    Bare bra her. “Just fine here.”

    These will, and do, sound strange in English. They’re all versions of saying that you’re doing fine. If you’re a beginner in the Norwegian language, it’s best to keep to the simple ones, like the first two listed. It’s good to take note of the others, too, since you’ll hear them (and different versions of them) quite often. As you might have noticed, some of the answers are used without a pronoun (me, I).

    Negative
    Nei, det går. “No, it’s okay.”
    Går som det går. “Goes like it goes.”
    Ikke særlig bra. “Not that good.”
    Nei, ganske dårlig her. “No, pretty bad here.”
    Ikke noe særlig. “Nothing much.”

    Like some of the positive ones, the negative responses are often used without pronouns. Note that the word går is used often. Går actually means “going/walking,” and is commonly used when explaining how you’re feeling.

    Below are some examples of actual answers you can get, or even give if you want to. These use some of the words from above, but with added sentences—which is how you’ll hear the answers in the wild!

    Remember that after you’ve answered, always add at least Du da? which means “You?” like you would in English.

    Positive

    • Det går bra her, jeg er litt sliten da. Men sånn er jo mandager! Du da?
      “It’s good here, I’m tired. But that’s how Mondays are! You?”
    • Det går flott med meg, jeg har ferie om to uker. Hva med deg?
      “I’m doing great, I have my holiday in two weeks. What with you?”
    • Joda, det går! Gleder meg til helgen, jeg skal ut å fiske. Og du da?
      “Sure, it’s good! I’m looking forward to the weekend, I’m going out fishing. And you?”
    • Nei, går flott her, er jo så fint vær!
      “No, it’s going great, the weather is so good!”

    Negative

    • Nei, det går. Sov litt lite i natt. Du da?
      “No, it’s okay. I didn’t sleep much last night. You?”
    • Joda, veldig sliten. Trente litt hardt i går.
      “Yeah, very tired. Worked out a little hard yesterday.”
    • Ikke så veldig bra, tror jeg begynner å bli syk. Hva med deg da?
      “Not very good, I think I’m starting to catch a cold. How about you?”


    3. Asking and Saying Your Name

    Woman Holding Question Mark Sign Over Face

    Before you learn how to say your name in Norwegian, it’s important to know how to ask for someone else’s. If not, how will you know if someone is asking you? Asking “What’s your name?” in Norwegian is very similar to how you would in English.

    Hva heter du? “What’s your name?”
    Hva er navnet ditt? “What’s your name?”

    Hva er navnet ditt? is informal, but of the two, the more polite way to ask. This is often used among adults or strangers. There’s also a third, less-used way of asking: Hva er ditt navn? which directly translates to “What is your name?” This is the formal way of asking, but it’s very rarely used.

    Now that you know how to ask, you need to learn how to answer!

    Jeg heter Anders. “My name is Anders.”
    Navnet mitt er Anders. “My name is Anders.”

    Again, two different ways to answer! Jeg heter is the common way of telling your name. It doesn’t matter if the person asked in a formal or informal way, you can still use this answer. You can also answer with Jeg er, which means “I am.”


    4. Asking and Saying Your Age

    Asking someone their age is done with a simple question, very similar to the English way. Let’s take a look at how to ask someone about their age.

    Hvor gammel er du? “How old are you?”

    This is the way everyone will ask for your age. It doesn’t matter if you’re family, friends, colleagues, or strangers.

    Now, over to how to answer the question. You can answer in two ways.

    Jeg er 30 år gammel. “I’m 30 years old.”
    Jeg er 30. “I’m 30.”

    Jeg er 30 år gammel means exactly the same as its English counterpart: “I’m 30 years old.” You can also choose to shorten this down, and only answer with Jeg er 30 år, omitting the gammel (meaning “old” in Norwegian). If you want, you can instead just say a simple Jeg er 30.

    As you might already have noticed, or will with time, some Norwegian questions or sentences often have both a full version and a shorter version where a word or more is omitted. It can be more polite to say the full sentence, but you won’t raise any eyebrows if you choose to say the short version.


    5. Asking and Telling Where You’re From

    Countries in Norwegian

    In Norwegian, there are a few ways to ask where someone’s from.

    Hvor er du fra? “Where are you from?”
    Hvor kommer du fra? “Where are you from?”
    Hvilket land kommer du fra? “Which country are you from?”

    The one you’ll get asked the most when visiting Norway is Hvor kommer du fra? Directly translated, this means “Where are you coming from?” This way of asking, as well as Hvor er du fra? is the informal way of asking. Hvilket land kommer du fra? is still informal, but it’s the most polite way to ask.

    If you ask someone Hvor er du fra? there’s a chance that they’ll answer the city that they’re from, or even their nationality, as this question is used for this information as well. It can be considered rude in Norway to ask for someone’s nationality however, so in most cases, they’re referring to country or city when asking this.

    So let’s take a look at how to answer this question. We’ll look at how to answer with your country and nationality, plus a combination of both.

    Jeg er fra England. “I’m from England.”
    Jeg er engelsk. “I’m English.”
    Jeg er fra England, men jeg er fransk. “I’m from England, but I’m French.”

    The first example is how you answer when you’re asked about which country you’re from. If you’re answering with a city, the sentence is the same, just switch the country with the city.

    The second example is for nationality. Below, you’ll find a few examples of how to say different nationalities in Norwegian.

    The third example is a combination of both. It’s possible to use a shorter version of this, which would be: Jeg er fra England, men er fransk. Here, you just omit the second pronoun. All of these examples mean the same directly translated from English, which makes them simple to remember!

    1- Examples of Countries and Corresponding Nationalities

    Countries
    Amerika/USA “America/USA”
    Canada “Canada”
    Australia “Australia”
    Tyskland “Germany”
    Frankrike “France”
    Spania “Spain”
    Kina “China”
    Sør-Korea “South Korea”
    England “England”

    Nationalities
    Amerikansk “American”
    Canadisk “Canadian”
    Australsk “Australian”
    Tysk “German”
    Fransk “French”
    Spansk “Spanish”
    Kinesisk “Chinese”
    Sør-Koreansk “South Korean”
    Engelsk “English”


    6. Saying Why You’re in Norway

    About Yourself

    The last thing to know when you’re learning to introduce yourself in Norwegian is how to say why you’re in Norway!

    Jeg er her på jobb. “I’m here on work.”
    Jeg er her på ferie. “I’m here on holiday.”
    Jeg besøker familie. “I’m visiting family.”

    Usually, the structure is Jeg er her, followed by the reason you’re in Norway. Jeg er her means “I’m here,” so again, it’s the same as in English! The last example shows a different structure. Here, Jeg is followed by the verb besøker. As long as you know the verb you want to use, this is also an easy sentence to use in different situations.


    7. How NorwegianClass101 Can Help You Learn Even More Norwegian!

    As mentioned throughout this article, there are multiple ways of introducing yourself in Norwegian. If you’re a beginner, it can seem a little overwhelming, and maybe even scary. However, practice makes perfect! Using this article as a reference can really help you when it comes to introducing yourself in Norwegian and making conversation.

    You can also check out NorwegianClass101 if you want to learn more Norwegian. Here, you can find in-depth articles that will help you on your way to learning the Norwegian language. Maybe you still want to learn more about Norwegian greetings? Then you can take a look at our blog post about greetings to get a better and more in-depth understanding of the different greetings. If you want to know how to say your age, we have an article all about the numeric system in Norwegian, as well.

    NorwegianClass101 has articles for both beginners and advanced users, so no matter where you are in your learning curve, you’ll find something that can help you on your way to mastering the Norwegian language.

    Before you go, let us know in the comments how you feel about self-introductions in Norwegian! Do you feel more confident now, or are you still struggling with something? To practice, write us a self-introduction in Norwegian language in the comments. :) We look forward to hearing from you!

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    Summer Solstice Celebration: Midsummer Day in Norway

    Around the time of the summer solstice, Norway begins its celebration of Midsummer. With the weather warm and the days long, there couldn’t be a better time to enjoy the Midsummer festival Norway puts on each year. On Midsummer, Norway’s traditions have lost much of their original meaning and significance, but Norwegians still find Midsummer Day a time of fun and merriment.

    In learning about Midsummer’s Eve traditions in Norway, you’re opening your eyes to some unique facets of the country’s culture. And as any successful language-learner can attest to, understanding a country’s culture is essential in mastering its language.

    At NorwegianClass101.com, we aim to make this learning journey both fun and informative!

    Log

    1. What is Midsummer Day?

    On Midsummer Day, Norway remembers the birth of John the Baptist and celebrates midsummer or the summer solstice. Midsummer’s Eve can also be called jonsok, which originates from Norse and means “vigil for Jon.”

    A long time ago, people believed that witches and other supernatural elements were abnormally strong on Midsummer’s Eve, since the sun turns that day. People gathered herbs and made a bonfire to keep the witches away. This was the origin of the Midsummer’s Eve bonfire.

    Even if St. John’s Eve as a folk tradition isn’t so strong anymore, Norwegians still appreciate this summer holiday.

    2. When is Midsummer?

    Month of June

    Norway celebrates Midsummer (and the birth of John the Baptist) each year on June 23.

    3. Reading Practice: Midsummer’s Eve Traditions

    A Bonfire

    How do Norwegians celebrate Midsummer today? On Midsummer night, Norway is known for its record-breaking bonfires, but that’s not all. Learn more about this Midsummer holiday Norway so enjoy by reading the Norwegian text below. You can find the English translation directly below it.

    De aller fleste nordmenn starter feiringen av Sankthansaften på ettermiddagen. Venner og familie samles for å spise og drikke sammen, og det vanligste er å grille. Etter dette leker barn og voksne , eller bare slapper av med prating. Dagen etter Sankthansaften er ikke lenger en fridag, så det finnes en del nordmenn som nå lar være å feire sankthansaften.

    Etter man har spist og kost seg i flere timer, drar alle sammen og ser på at Sankthansbålet blir tent. Langs Norges kystlinje kan man se bål et etter et og mennesker som samles rundt de store bålene. Å se på Sankthansbålet brenne i skumringen er noe nordmenn synes er ekstra fint. Noen steder, som i nord, er det også en tradisjon å gå opp i fjellene istedet for å se på bål.

    På sankthansaften i Norge er det ikke bare bål som blir satt fyr på, men også båter. På sørlandet, i Flekkefjord, er det vanlig å sette fyr på en gammel båt som er fylt med brennbare materialer. Denne tradisjonen startet på 1800-tallet, da ungdom fant en gammel bål, fylte den opp, tente på og så dro de denne båten med seg omkring i gatene. Grunnet brannfare blir denne båten nå ankret på sjøen og tent på der.

    Most Norwegians will start the celebration in the afternoon. Friends and family gather to eat and drink together, and the most common activity is to barbecue. After this, the children and adults will play or relax and chat. The day after Midsummer’s Eve is no longer a holiday, so some Norwegians refrain from celebrating St. John’s Eve.

    After eating and having fun for hours, everyone goes together to watch the lighting of St John’s bonfires. Along Norway’s coastline, you can see one bonfire after another and people gathering around the big bonfires. Looking at a bonfire burn in the dusk is something Norwegians really like. In certain places, it is also tradition to go up into the mountains instead of enjoying bonfires.

    Midsummer’s Eve in Norway doesn’t only see bonfires set on fire, but also boats. In the southern part of Norway, in Flekkefjord, it is common to set an old boat filled with burning materials on fire. This tradition started in the 1800s when kids found an old boat, filled it up, lit a fire, and pulled the boat through the streets. Because of the fire hazard, boats are now anchored in the ocean and set alight there.

    4. Tallest Bonfire in Norway

    When it comes to the Midsummer bonfire, Norway isn’t just playing around. How tall do you think the biggest bonfire has been in Norway to date?

    The tallest bonfire in Norway was in 2016, measuring 47.4 meters (about 155.5 feet). This bonfire currently holds the world record, and is called Slinningsbålet, referring to the tallest bonfire. Because of the fire hazard and pollution, many places in Norway prohibit St. John’s Eve bonfires.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for Midsummer in Norway

    Wreath of Flowers

    Here’s the most important vocabulary you should know for the Midsummer holiday in Norway!

    • Sommer — “Summer”
    • Juni — “June”
    • Grille — “Grill”
    • Midtsommer — “Midsummer”
    • Solverv — “Solstice”
    • Bål — “Bonfire”
    • Ild — “Fire”
    • Midnattsol — “Midnight sun
    • Kyst — “Coast”
    • Selskap — “Company”
    • Jorbær — “Strawberry”
    • Blomsterkrans — “Flower wreath”

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, visit our Norwegian Midsummer Day vocabulary list. Here, each word is accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think of Norway’s Midsummer celebrations? Does your country also celebrate Midsummer Day, and if so, are traditions there similar or very different? Let us know in the comments; we always love hearing from you!

    To continue learning about Norwegian culture and the language, visit us at NorwegianClass101.com! We provide effective, practical learning tools for every learner so that anyone can master Norwegian. Read more insightful blog posts like this one, spruce up your Norwegian vocabulary, and chat with fellow Norwegian learners on our community forums. You can also upgrade to Premium Plus to begin using our MyTeacher program, where you can learn Norwegian with your own personal teacher!

    Learning Norwegian is no easy goal to achieve, but your determination and good work will begin reaping rewards before you know it! And NorwegianClass101.com will be here with you on each step of your journey to language mastery.

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    How to Celebrate Norwegian Independence Day

    Norwegian Independence Day is the most important holiday in the country. It holds such significance to Norwegians, in fact, that celebrations aren’t limited to Norway (such as the celebration of Norwegian Constitution Day in Ballard, Seattle in the United States). Norwegian Constitution Day commemorates the date that Norway gained independence through the finally accepted Norway Constitution.

    In learning about this holiday, you’re gaining insight into Norway’s long history and rich culture. Cultural knowledge is vital to learning any language, and at NorwegianClass101.com, we hope to make this learning expedition both fun and informative! Learn how to say “Happy Constitution Day” in Norwegian and more with us!

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    1. What is Constitution Day in Norway?

    An important day for every Norwegian, the Norway Constitution Day is really a day where one can see the entire nation gathered. The Norwegians call Constitution Day their national day.

    Norwegian Independence Day is held in commemoration of when the Norway Constitution was accepted in 1814. It became a day of celebration, and Norwegians started to hold parades to celebrate their independence day. From 1870 on, the first children’s parades started and this is a tradition that remains today.

    2. When is the Norwegian Independence Day?

    Flag of Norway

    Each year, Norwegians celebrate Constitution Day on May 17, the day that their Constitution was finalized and their country’s independence gained.

    3. Reading Practice: Norwegian Constitution Day Celebrations

    Ice Cream Drizzled with Syrup

    Read the Norwegian text below to learn about Norwegian Constitution Day traditions. You’ll find the English translation directly below it.

    De aller fleste nordmenn starter 17.mai dagen tidlig. Man står opp og tar på seg fine klær. Mange folk bruker også Norges tradisjonelle folkedrakt, kalt bunad. Deretter drar alle barn til den plassen hvor barnetoget skal starte, og foreldre og familie står langs gatene for å se på toget som går forbi. Alle barna synger norske sanger, roper hurra-rop og vifter med det norske flagget.

    Etter at 17.mai-toget er over, hører de fleste på 17.mai tale, for å deretter dra på en feiring som blir arrangert av den lokale skolen. På disse feiringene synger barna sanger, leker, har sekkeløp og potetløp. Om en familie ikke har små barn, grilles det ofte med familie og venner i hagen.

    Det er ingen regler for hva man skal spise på Nasjonaldagen, men de aller fleste nordmenn forbinder mat på 17.mai med pølser, is og brus.

    Most Norwegians start the May 17 Day early. You get up and put on nice clothes. Many use the Norwegian traditional suit, called Bunad. After this, all the children go to the place where the parade will start, and the parents and family stand along the streets to watch the parade that goes by. All the children sing Norwegian songs, shout “Hooray,” and wave the Norwegian flag.

    After the May 17 parade is over, most people will listen to the May 17 speech, and then go to a celebration that is arranged by the local school. During these events, the kids will sing songs, play, and have sack races and potato races. If a family does not have small children, there will often be a barbecue with family and friends in the yard.

    There are no rules for what one should eat on the national holiday, but most Norwegians associate May 17 with hot dogs, ice cream, and soda.

    4. Royal Palace (Oslo) & The Royal Family

    What do you think the Royal Family does on May 17?

    On May 17, the King, Queen, and the rest of the Royal Family stands on the Royal Palace in Oslo’s balcony and waves to the Norwegian people. The children’s parade in Oslo stops in front of the Castle, and many Norwegian children look forward to catching a glimpse of the Royal Family.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for Norwegian Independence Day

    Band Playing Music

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Constitution Day in Norway!

    • Iskrem — “Ice cream”
    • Synge — “Sing”
    • Sang — “Song”
    • Grunnlovsdagen — “Constitution Day”
    • Skolekorps — “School band”
    • Det Konglige Slott — “Royal Palace, Oslo”
    • Dronning — “Queen”
    • Parade — “Parade”
    • Nasjonaldag — “National day”
    • Musikkorps — “Music band”
    • Konge — “King”
    • Pølse — “Hotdog”
    • Flaggdag — “Flag day”
    • Kronprins — “Crown Prince”
    • Janitsjarkorps — “Concert band”
    • Slott — “Castle”
    • Bunad — “Bunad”
    • Nasjonalsang — “Anthem”

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Norwegian Constitution Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    The Norwegian Independence Day is a holiday that the country’s people as a whole can celebrate together, and they do! What do you think of the Norwegian Constitution Day traditions we discussed? Does your country have a Constitution Day? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn more about Norwegian culture and the language, visit us at NorwegianClass101.com. Here, you’ll find insightful blog posts on a variety of topics, fun podcasts to learn on the go, and free vocabulary lists to expand your word bank! You can also discuss lessons with fellow Norwegian learners on our forums and take advantage of our MyTeacher program with a Premium Plus account. At NorwegianClass101.com, there’s something for every learner and every learner can master the Norwegian language with enough effort and determination!

    Until next time, Lykkelig Grunnlov Dag (”Happy Constitution Day” ) in Norway! Enjoy some Norwegian Constitution Day food for us. ;)

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    How to Say I Love You in Norwegian - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Norwegian could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Norwegian partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At NorwegianClass101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Norwegian lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Norwegian dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Norwegian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Norwegian Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Norwegian Faster?

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    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Norwegian love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Norwegian word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Norwegian date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Norwegian Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Har du lyst til å gå ut å spise middag med meg?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Norwegian is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Er du ledig i helgen?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Har du lyst til å henge med meg?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • Når skal vi møtes i morgen?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Hvor skal vi møtes?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Du ser bra ut.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Du er så søt.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Hva synes du om dette stedet?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Norwegian language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Kan vi møtes igjen?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Skal vi gå et annet sted?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • Jeg vet om et bra sted.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Jeg kan kjøre deg hjem.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • Det var en flott kveld.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Når kan jeg se deg igjen?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Jeg ringer deg.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Norwegian phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Norwegian below!

    Date Ideas in Norwegian

    museum

    • museum

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • middag med levende lys

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • gå til dyreparken

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • gå en lang tur

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • gå på opera

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • gå til et akvarium

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • gå på stranden

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • gå på piknik

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • lage mat sammen

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • spise middag og se en film

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Norwegian

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Norwegian - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Norwegian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Norwegian yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Norwegian? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Norwegian love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Norwegian

    I love you.

    • Jeg elsker deg.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Norwegian carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Du betyr så mye for meg.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Vil du være min valentine?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Du er så vakker.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Norwegian, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Jeg ser på deg som mer enn en venn.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Norwegian dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Hundre hjerter ville være for få til å bære all min kjærlighet for deg.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Kjærlighet er kjærlighet. Det kan aldri bli forklart.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Du er så kjekk.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Norwegian love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • Jeg er forelsket i deg.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Du får meg til å ville bli en bedre mann.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Norwegian girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • La alt dere gjør, skje i kjærlighet.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Du er min sol, min kjærlighet.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Ord kan ikke beskrive min kjærlighet til deg.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Vi var ment til å være sammen.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Hvis du tenker på noen mens du leser dette, er du definitivt forelsket.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Norwegian Quotes about Love

    Norwegian Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Norwegian lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Norwegian that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Norwegian Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Norwegian lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Norwegian custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Norwegian Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Vi må snakke sammen.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Det er ikke deg. Det er meg.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Norwegian lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Jeg er bare ikke klar for denne type forhold.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • La oss bare være venner.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Norwegian, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Jeg tror vi trenger en pause.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Du fortjener bedre.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Vi bør begynne å se andre mennesker.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Jeg trenger mer tid for meg selv.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Jeg tror vi går for fort.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Jeg trenger å fokusere på karrieren min.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Jeg er ikke god nok for deg.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Jeg bare elsker deg ikke lenger.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Vi er bare ikke riktige for hverandre.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Det er for det beste.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Vi har vokst fra hverandre.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Norwegian faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. NorwegianClass101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Norwegian language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Norwegian Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Norwegian speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    NorwegianClass101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Norwegian, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Norwegian even faster.

    2- Having your Norwegian romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Norwegian language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Norwegian lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Norwegian partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why NorwegianClass101 helps you learn Norwegian Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Norwegian is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at NorwegianClass101 is translated into both English and Norwegian. So, while your partner can help you learn Norwegian faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Norwegian Culture
    At NorwegianClass101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Norway. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Norwegian partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Norwegian Phrases
    You now have access to NorwegianClass101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Norwegian soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

    Learning A Language on Your Own

    Can You Really Learn Norwegian Alone?

    Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

    Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Norwegian or any language without traditional classroom instruction: NorwegianClass101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is NorwegianClass101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

    Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Norwegian or any language alone.

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    3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

    Learning Alone

    1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

    In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Norwegian alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

    2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

    Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Norwegian alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Norwegian and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

    3. Learning Norwegian Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

    Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

    How to Learn a Language on Your Own with NorwegianClass101

    Learning with NorwegianClass101

    1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Norwegian Audio & Video Lessons

    The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Norwegian conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. NorwegianClass101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Norwegian instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Norwegian actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

    2. “Learning Paths” with Norwegian Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

    Although NorwegianClass101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, NorwegianClass101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

    3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

    When you have the right tools and Norwegian learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, NorwegianClass101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

    • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
    • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
    • Review Quizzes
    • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
    • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
    • Norwegian Dictionary with Pronunciation
    • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
    • And Much More!

    Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Norwegian alone and reach your goals!

    Conclusion

    Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Norwegian on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

    NorwegianClass101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, NorwegianClass101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

    And the best part is: With NorwegianClass101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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