Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric:
Hi everyone, and welcome back to NorwegianClass101.com. This is Upper Beginner Season 1 Lesson 5 - Hell's Kitchen, Norway Edition. Eric Here.
Ida:
Hallo. I'm Ida.
Eric:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about percentages. The conversation takes place at a table in a restaurant.
Ida:
It's between Linda and a waiter.
Eric:
The speakers are strangers, so they’ll be using polite Norwegian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Kelner:
Er alt i orden nå? Har du lyst på dessert?
Linda:
Nei takk, bare regninga.
...litt senere...
Kelner:
Vær så god. Kort eller kontant?
Linda:
Vent litt. Det står her "MVA 25% (tjuefem prosent)".
Kelner:
MVA er moms; og satsen er 25% (tjuefem prosent) på mat på restauranter.
Linda:
Og du har tatt 20% (tjue prosent) i drikkepenger!
Kelner:
Beklager. Det var en feil.
Linda:
Jeg tror du har gjort så mange feil at du får ikke driks fra meg.
Kelner:
Blir det kort da?
Eric:
Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Kelner:
Er alt i orden nå? Har du lyst på dessert?
Linda:
Nei takk, bare regninga.
...litt senere...
Kelner:
Vær så god. Kort eller kontant?
Linda:
Vent litt. Det står her "MVA 25% (tjuefem prosent)".
Kelner:
MVA er moms; og satsen er 25% (tjuefem prosent) på mat på restauranter.
Linda:
Og du har tatt 20% (tjue prosent) i drikkepenger!
Kelner:
Beklager. Det var en feil.
Linda:
Jeg tror du har gjort så mange feil at du får ikke driks fra meg.
Kelner:
Blir det kort da?
Eric:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Kelner:
Is everything alright now? Would you like dessert?
Linda:
No thank you, just the bill.
...later...
Kelner:
Here we are. Card or cash?
Linda:
Hang on. It says "MVA 25%".
Kelner:
MVA is sales tax; and the rate is 25% on food at restaurants.
Linda:
And you've taken 20% in tips!
Kelner:
Sorry. That's a mistake.
Linda:
I think you've made so many mistakes that you won't be getting a tip from me.
Kelner:
You'll be paying by card then?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric:
Ida, is tipping common or required in Norway?
Ida:
Tipping is not required anywhere. People in the service branches do not live off of their tips as in some other countries.
Eric:
So this means that service and sales taxes are always included in the bills at restaurants and bars?
Ida:
Right. But Norwegians do tip, usually around 10% percent, if they think the service and/or food was good. It can be seen as a kind gesture towards the restaurant staff. At fancier restaurants, tipping is very common.
Eric:
In the dialogue Linda was checking the bill before paying...
Ida:
Although Norwegians are pretty financially secure compared to other countries, they are very precise and usually check their receipt thoroughly when they get it. If something is wrong they’ll let the restaurant staff know it right away.
Eric:
What’s the Norwegian word for “tips”?
Ida:
Drikkepenger
Eric:
Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Ida:
dessert [natural native speed]
Eric:
dessert
Ida:
dessert[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
dessert [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
regning [natural native speed]
Eric:
check
Ida:
regning[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
regning [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
kort [natural native speed]
Eric:
card
Ida:
kort[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
kort [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
kontant [natural native speed]
Eric:
cash
Ida:
kontant[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
kontant [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
MVA [natural native speed]
Eric:
VAT
Ida:
MVA[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
MVA [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
sats [natural native speed]
Eric:
rate
Ida:
sats [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
sats [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
mat [natural native speed]
Eric:
food
Ida:
mat[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
mat [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
restaurant [natural native speed]
Eric:
restaurant
Ida:
restaurant[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
restaurant [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
drikkepenger [natural native speed]
Eric:
tips
Ida:
drikkepenger[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
drikkepenger [natural native speed]
Eric:
Next we have..
Ida:
driks [natural native speed]
Eric:
tip
Ida:
driks[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ida:
driks [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric:
Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Ida:
alt i orden
Eric:
meaning "everything all right?"
Ida:
alt means "everything" and i orden means "in order," so together it becomes "everything in order" or "everything okay?"
Eric:
It can be used as a means to interrupt a conversation. For example, in the dialogue the waiter interjects using the phrase to find out whether the customers want dessert. But this can also be used when you’re actually concerned about something.
Ida:
Right, for example if you see two people arguing, you could ask Unnskyld, er alt i orden?
Eric:
Can this phrase also be used in an affirmative sentence?
Ida:
Alt i orden can be used in an affirmative sentence as well, but remember to change the place of the verb, just as in English. It becomes Ja, alt er i orden, meaning "Yes, everything is okay."
Eric:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Ida:
det står
Eric:
meaning "it says."
Ida:
Det means "it" and står in this context means "written down on something," so together det står literally means "it's written."
Eric:
When do you use it?
Ida:
It can be used when you want to back up what you're saying, or confirm something. For example, Det står på plakaten at konserten begynner klokken seks
Eric:
which means "It says on the billboard that the concert starts at six."
Ida:
The verb står in Norwegian has a lot of different meanings, such as "to stand" or "to be,” or “to act like." That means it’s important to understand the context of a sentence because Det står på rommet can mean both "it says in the room" or "it is in the room."
Eric:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Ida:
å gjøre feil
Eric:
meaning "to make a mistake."
Ida:
Å gjøre is the verb "to make" and en feil is the noun "an error."
Eric:
This is a very straightforward expression and you can use it when you’re excusing yourself for something.
Ida:
For example, you could simply say Unnskyld, jeg gjorde en feil
Eric:
meaning "Sorry, I made a mistake." Can you give us another example in a different context?
Ida:
Sure. For example, you can say.. Er det mulig å gjøre så mange feil på en gang?
Eric:
.. which means "Is it possible to make so many mistakes at once?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric:
In this lesson you will learn how to discuss the charges on a bill.
Ida:
We'll specifically look at how to read numbers in percentage, in fractions, and with a decimal point.
Eric:
Let’s start with percentages. There were several examples in the dialogue.
Ida:
If you already know how to read numbers, it’s simple. You just have to say the number followed by the word prosent
Eric:
meaning “percent.” Let’s see some example sentences.
Ida:
Jeg gir maks ti prosent i drikkepenger.
Eric:
“I give at most 10% in tips.”
Ida:
Jeg fikk 70% (sytti prosent) avslag på genseren.
Eric:
“I got the sweater for 70% off.” Now let’s see how to read fractions. In some cases, you may hear people talk about prices in fractions. For example let’s look at “one third.”
Ida:
Norwegian is the same as English - you just have to say the cardinal number followed by the ordinal number and add del, so en tredjedel. Del is optional, so you can just say en tredje. Please remember that del is not optional only in the case of en halvdel
Eric:
Which means “one half.” And how do you say one fourth, or “a quarter”?
Ida:
en fjerdedel or en fjerde
Eric:
Can we hear an example sentence?
Ida:
Jeg kjøpte golfsettet for en tredjedel av den ordinære prisen.
Eric:
“I bought the golf set for a third of the original price.” And what if it’s half price?
Ida:
Usually if it’s half price we don’t use en halvdel, but say it in the same way as in English, just using the word halv. For example, Hun ga meg halv pris for skoene.
Eric:
meaning “She gave me the shoes for half price.” Now, let’s talk about how to read numbers with a decimal point, even though you probably won’t use these to talk about prices.
Ida:
First let’s mention that when writing numbers with a decimal point, Norwegians use commas, not points. This also affects the way you read them.
Eric:
For example, 0.5
Ida:
In Norwegian is null komma fem
Eric:
2.2
Ida:
to komma to. It’s number, followed by komma, followed by the other number.
Eric:
What are some other good words to know when talking about numbers?
Ida:
totalbeløp
Eric:
“total amount”
Ida:
å redusere
Eric:
“to decrease”
Ida:
å øke
Eric:
“to increase”
Ida:
Here’s an example, Når økte prisene?
Eric:
Which means “When did the prices increase?” Ok, to sum up this lesson, let’s give another couple of examples.
Ida:
Vi kan se salgene har økt med 2.5 %(to komma fem prosent) i år 2014.
Eric:
“We can see that sales have increased by 2.5 percent.”
Ida:
Another example is Merverdiavgiften i Norge er på 25% (tjuefem prosent).
Eric:
"The value-added tax in Norway is 25%."

Outro

Eric:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Ida:
Ha det bra.

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