Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome to NorwegianClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 1 - A Norwegian Job Interview. Eric Here.
Mai: Hei, I'm Mai.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to discuss work experience in an elaborate way. The conversation takes place at a grocery store.
Mai: It's between Anne and Gunnar.
Eric: The speakers are strangers, and they will use both formal and informal Norwegian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Anne: Hei, jeg heter Anne og jeg søker på jobben som butikkmedarbeider.
Gunnar: Hei. Jeg er Gunnar. Har du noen erfaring med å jobbe i matbutikk?
Anne: Nei, men jeg har jobbet i en klesbutikk tidligere, så jeg er serviceinnstilt og kan håndtere stress godt.
Gunnar: Det høres bra ut. Hvilke dager kan du jobbe på?
Anne: Jeg kan jobbe alle dager, men helst ikke sene kvelder siden jeg må rekke bussen hjem.
Gunnar: Det er greit. Kan du komme og prøvejobbe i morgen klokka 10?
Anne: Ja, gjerne det. Vi sees i morgen.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Anne: Hi, my name is Anne and I'm applying for the job as a shop employee.
Gunnar: Hi. I'm Gunnar. Do you have any experience with working in a grocery store?
Anne: No, but I've worked in a clothing store before, so I'm service-oriented and can handle stress well.
Gunnar: That sounds good. Which days can you work on?
Anne: I can work all days, but preferably not late nights since I have to catch the bus home.
Gunnar: That's okay. Can you come and do a work trial tomorrow at 10 o'clock?
Anne: Yes, please. See you tomorrow.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Mai, is it common for Norwegian students to get part-time jobs?
Mai: Yes, in Norway many students have part-time jobs.
Eric: What kinds of jobs are common?
Mai: The most common jobs are in restaurants or supermarkets.
Eric: Are there any limitations on student work?
Mai: Well, if you are under the age of 13, you need written permission from your parents to work. A person who is over the age of 15 can work up to 8 hours a day, 40 hours a week, but people under 18 are not allowed to work between 11 p.m and 6 a.m.
Eric: It seems like Norway has strict laws that protect working youth.
Mai: That’s true, the salary is also pretty high for part-time jobs, even though it depends on your age and work place. The average is between 110 and 150 crowns per hour.
Eric: One euro is about 9.5 Norwegian crowns. What’s the Norwegian for “crowns per hour”?
Mai: kroner i timen
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Mai: butikkmedarbeider [natural native speed]
Eric: shop employee
Mai: butikkmedarbeider[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: butikkmedarbeider [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: matbutikk [natural native speed]
Eric: supermarket, grocery store
Mai: matbutikk[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: matbutikk [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: å håndtere [natural native speed]
Eric: to handle
Mai: å håndtere[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: å håndtere [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: serviceinnstilt [natural native speed]
Eric: service-oriented
Mai: serviceinnstilt[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: serviceinnstilt [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: å søke [natural native speed]
Eric: to apply, to look for, to search for
Mai: å søke[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: å søke [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: helst [natural native speed]
Eric: preferably
Mai: helst[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: helst [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: å rekke [natural native speed]
Eric: to catch
Mai: å rekke[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: å rekke [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: å prøvejobbe [natural native speed]
Eric: to trial work
Mai: å prøvejobbe[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: å prøvejobbe [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Mai: gjerne [natural native speed]
Eric: gladly, with pleasure, please
Mai: gjerne[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: gjerne [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Mai: erfaring [natural native speed]
Eric: experience
Mai: erfaring[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mai: erfaring [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Mai: å søke
Eric: meaning "to apply,” “to look for,” “to search for"
Mai: You use å søke when you are looking for something, searching for something, or applying for a job. Å søke jobb literally means "to search for work", but is used more as "to apply for a job" or "to seek employment".
Eric: Can you use this verb both for abstract and actual things?
Mai: Yes, you can can, for example you often use it when you search for something on the internet.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Mai: Sure. For example, you can say.. Vi søker etter en organisert og effektiv person.
Eric: ..which means "We're searching for an organized and effective person."
Eric: When the word is used as "to search" or "to look," in everyday life it can sound a bit formal.
Mai: Right, so in that case, you can use å lete instead. For example, Jeg leter etter deg, which means, "I am looking for you."
Eric: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Mai: høres bra ut
Eric: meaning "sounds good"
Mai: å høre means "to sound", bra means "good" and ut means "out".
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Mai: For example, you can say.. Jeg synes Per sitt forslag høres bra ut.
Eric: .. which means "I think Per's suggestion sounds good."
Mai: You can also use å virke bra or å virke god
Eric: which both mean “to seem good”
Eric: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Mai: helst ikke
Eric: meaning "rather not"
Mai: Helst is an adverb and means "preferably." Ikke means "not."
Eric: You use this expression when you would prefer to not do something.
Mai: It doesn't mean that you can't do it, just that you don't really want to.
Eric: Using this expression, you can answer a yes or no question, if you want to make your negation less strong. Mai, can you give us an example using this word?
Mai: Sure. For example, you can say.. Jeg vil helst ikke spise kokte poteter hver dag.
Eric: .. which means "I would rather not eat boiled potatoes every day." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to talk about your work experience in an elaborate way.
Mai: You will learn past tense and present perfect.
Eric: Let’s start by saying how to use and form the present perfect tense.
Mai: We use the present perfect tense to talk about actions that have happened at an unspecified time in the past. For example, you can use this tense with general time phrases such as "before," "previously," "once," and "already."
Eric: Like in English, when we use the present perfect tense, the emphasis lies on the consequence and not when something happened. Can you give us an example?
Mai: Det har regnet
Eric: meaning “It has rained.” Here the importance lies in the consequence, which, in this case, would be that it is still wet outside because it rained. Is there an example of this in the dialogue?
Mai: Yes, when Anne says Jeg har jobbet i en klesbutikk tidligere
Eric: meaning "I have worked in a clothing store before"
Mai: This explains that she has experience working in a clothing store.
Eric: The present perfect is also used to talk about changes that have happened over a period of time.
Mai: Right, for example, Du har fått langt hår
Eric: meaning "Your hair has gotten long." Now, can we see how to practically form a verb in the present perfect?
Mai: All you have to do is to state the subject, then har, and finally the main verb in the past participle.
Eric: Let’s give some examples. Let’s consider the verb “to walk”
Mai: in Norwegian that is å gå and the present perfect is har gått, for example you can say Jeg har gått til parken før.
Eric: “I have walked to the park before.” Now let’s consider the verb, “to study”
Mai: in Norwegian that is å studere and the present perfect is har studert, for example you can say Hun har studert i fem år.
Eric: “She has studied for five years.” Let’s also take a look at the verb “to be”
Mai: in Norwegian that is å være, and the present perfect is har vært. For example, you can say Jeg har vært i servicebransjen siden jeg var 20.
Eric: “I have been in the service industry since I was 20.” Ok now, let’s compare the present perfect with the past tense.
Mai: If an event occurred before now and is also complete, we use the simple past form of the verb.
Eric: Is it like in English where we often use the simple past tense with specific time expressions such as “an hour ago” and “yesterday?”
Mai: Yes, that’s correct. For example, Det snødde forrige uke.
Eric: “It snowed last week.”
Mai: On the other hand, we use the present perfect form to talk about situations that began in the past and continue to the present, as well as for recently completed actions.
Eric: So the focus is on the situation or consequence of the situation, not when it happened.
Mai: For example, Det har snødd tidligere.
Eric: meaning “It snowed earlier.” Ok, now let’s move on to the next topic, the nominalization of verbs.
Mai: Nominalization is when a verb is modified into a noun.
Eric: In Norwegian, nominalizations are often technical concepts and are used to express oneself more precisely, which can be really useful at a job interview.
Mai: And when we use nominalizations, we sound more formal. In the dialogue, Gunnar used the noun erfaring meaning “experience.” This word comes from the verb å erfare meaning “to experience.”
Eric: So what is the rule for verb nominalization?
Mai: The suffixes -ing and -ning are often added to the end of the verb to change it into a noun. -ing often indicates the verb action, and -ning often indicates the result of the verb action, also -ning can’t be used on verbs that end in -ere, like å studere.
Eric: Let’s see an example of verbs that can be nominalized in both ways.
Mai: For example å bygge
Eric: which means “to build,” or “to construct”
Mai: can become bygging
Eric: “construction,” meaning the action of building something.
Mai: or bygning
Eric: “building,” meaning the result of the action, therefore “a building.”
Mai: You can also use the suffix -sjon to indicate a result of an action, just like -ning. For example, starting from the verb å motivere, you can have both motivasjon and motivering.
Eric: Both meaning “motivation”
Mai: Sometimes, instead of -ing, you might also have seen nouns that end with the suffix -else, which is very formal. For example we can say both retting and rettelse
Eric: meaning “correction.”
Mai: Finally, we also have the zero-derivation, a nominalization for which we don’t need a suffix.
Eric: Zero-derivation is the noun that is often used in compound nouns and newspapers.
Mai: Let’s take the verb å vaske meaning “to wash.” You can nominalize it either using the suffix -ing, as in Vasking, or without suffixes, vask. We can use vask in compound words, such as klesvask.
Eric: meaning “washing of clothes,” which is the laundry.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Mai: Ha det bra!

11 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

NorwegianClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Welcome back to NorwegianClass101.com!

NorwegianClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 3:33 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hei Simon,


Unfortunately it is not possible to change to lessons already recorded, but this is something for us to consider in the future when we make new lessons. In the meanwhile, you can always use the pause function on the audio to give yourself a little time to practice in between the Norwegian and English.


Regards,

Patrick

Team NorwegianClass101.com

Simon A Brownlie
Saturday at 10:31 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Is it possible to make the spaces between the phrases and translations a little longer, in the powerpoint, without slowing down the pronunciation? It seems like a good opportunity to practice pronunciation, however currently halfway through repeating the phrase you get interrupted by the translation.


Takk.

NorwegianClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 11:06 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hei Don,


There are many variations of the name Patrick in common use in both Norway and the other Scandinavian countries, but in my case it is indeed a British parent.


Hope you continue to enjoy and find good use in our lessons! 😄


Sincerely,

Patrick

Team NorwegianClass101.com

Don Torgersen
Sunday at 12:30 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Patrick teaching Norwegian. Hmm. Have you descended from the Irish who worked the fields on the west coast of Ireland a thousand years ago and were captured by the Vikings and enslaved in a Norwegian family? And now you teach us Norwegian and have forsaken your Gaelic heritage? Or are you a recent immigrant? Thank you for improving my languished Norse tongue. I'll stand on the end of Troll Tongue and recite what I have learned. At the request of the King of Sweden, Ole Bull climbed the Great Pyramid at Gizeh and played Norwegian songs on his violin. Uff-da.

NorwegianClass101.com
Thursday at 12:12 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hei Stan,


I hope you don't mind, but I'm going to explain this in English because I'm going to try to relate these words to English examples. "Heller" and "helst" can both be the same as the English "rather", however there is an important difference. "Heller" infers that someone would rather do one thing over another, but "helst" infers that they would only want to do one of the things.


Sincerely,

Patrick

Team NorwegianClass101.com

Stan
Thursday at 3:45 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Kanskje du har forklart denne på andre sted, men kan du forklare forskjellen mellom “heller” og “helst”?

NorwegianClass101.comVerified
Monday at 11:54 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hei Ida,


Takk for tilbakemeldingen, vi skal se hva vi kan få til fremover.


Håper du har en fin uke!


Hilsen,

Mai

Team NorwegianClass101.com

Ida Pavicic
Tuesday at 8:54 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


Takk for disse nyttige leksene.

MEN !!!

For studenter som nå kan en god del norsk dere skulle unngå forklaring på engelsk.

Vi trenger forklaring på Norsk og bare Norsk.


A lytte til så mye Engelsk når vi ville lære bare Norsk er frustrerende og hjelper ikke.

Være så snill og bytte Engelsk med Norsk.


I andre fall synes jeg at dere gjør kjempebra jobb!

Takk for det.


Ida


NorwegianClass101.comVerified
Monday at 10:31 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Kimi,


Let us know if you have any questions!


Regards,

Mai

Team NorwegianClass101.com

kimi nisha
Friday at 4:34 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

very much helping thanks for the good help your giving to us, lolllllll this is real very greatfull thanks a lot,